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Western diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus: a longitudinal investigation

Jacka, Felice N., Cherbuin, Nicolas, Anstey, Kaarin J., Sachdev, Perminder and Butterworth, Peter 2015, Western diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus: a longitudinal investigation, BMC medicine, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12916-015-0461-x.

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Title Western diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus: a longitudinal investigation
Author(s) Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Cherbuin, Nicolas
Anstey, Kaarin J.
Sachdev, Perminder
Butterworth, Peter
Journal name BMC medicine
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-09-08
ISSN 1741-7015
Keyword(s) Brain derived neurotrophic factor
Diet
Hippocampus
Magnetic resonance imaging
Neurogenesis
Nutrition
Summary Background: Recent meta-analyses confirm a relationship between diet quality and both depression and cognitive health in adults. While the biological pathways that underpin these relationships are likely multitudinous, extensive evidence from animal studies points to the involvement of the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to examine the association between dietary patterns and hippocampal volume in humans, and to assess whether diet was associated with differential rates of hippocampal atrophy over time. Methods: Data were drawn from the Personality and Total Health Through Life Study and focused on a subsample of the cohort (n = 255) who were aged 60-64 years at baseline in 2001, completed a food frequency questionnaire, and underwent two magnetic resonance imaging scans approximately 4 years apart. Longitudinal generalized estimating equation linear regression models were used to assess the association between dietary factors and left and right hippocampal volumes over time. Results: Every one standard deviation increase in healthy "prudent" dietary pattern was associated with a 45.7 mm3 (standard error 22.9 mm3) larger left hippocampal volume, while higher consumption of an unhealthy "Western" dietary pattern was (independently) associated with a 52.6 mm3 (SE 26.6 mm3) smaller left hippocampal volume. These relationships were independent of covariates including age, gender, education, labour-force status, depressive symptoms and medication, physical activity, smoking, hypertension and diabetes. While hippocampal volume declined over time, there was no evidence that dietary patterns influenced this decline. No relationships were observed between dietary patterns and right hippocampal volume. Conclusions: Lower intakes of nutrient-dense foods and higher intakes of unhealthy foods are each independently associated with smaller left hippocampal volume. To our knowledge, this is the first human study to demonstrate associations between diet and hippocampal volume concordant with data previously observed in animal models.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0461-x
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078433

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.