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Maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy prevents long-term changes in diaphragm muscle structure and function after birth asphyxia

LaRosa, Domenic A., Ellery, Stacey J., Parkington, Helena C., Snow, Rod J., Walker, David W. and Dickinson, Hayley 2016, Maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy prevents long-term changes in diaphragm muscle structure and function after birth asphyxia, PLoS one, vol. 11, no. 3, Article number: e0149840, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0149840.

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Title Maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy prevents long-term changes in diaphragm muscle structure and function after birth asphyxia
Author(s) LaRosa, Domenic A.
Ellery, Stacey J.
Parkington, Helena C.
Snow, Rod J.ORCID iD for Snow, Rod J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4796-6916
Walker, David W.
Dickinson, Hayley
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 11
Issue number 3
Season Article number: e0149840
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) animals
animals, newborn
asphyxia neonatorum
creatine
diaphragm
dietary supplements
disease models, animal
female
male
mice
muscle contraction
muscle fatigue
pregnancy
Summary Using a model of birth asphyxia, we previously reported significant structural and functional deficits in the diaphragm muscle in spiny mice, deficits that are prevented by supplementing the maternal diet with 5% creatine from mid-pregnancy. The long-term effects of this exposure are unknown. Pregnant spiny mice were fed control or 5% creatine-supplemented diet for the second half of pregnancy, and fetuses were delivered by caesarean section with or without 7.5 min of in-utero asphyxia. Surviving pups were raised by a cross-foster dam until 33±2 days of age when they were euthanized to obtain the diaphragm muscle for ex-vivo study of twitch tension and muscle fatigue, and for structural and enzymatic analyses. Functional analysis of the diaphragm revealed no differences in single twitch contractile parameters between any groups. However, muscle fatigue, induced by stimulation of diaphragm strips with a train of pulses (330 ms train/sec, 40 Hz) for 300 sec, was significantly greater for asphyxia pups compared with controls (p<0.05), and this did not occur in diaphragms of creatine + asphyxia pups. Birth asphyxia resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of glycolytic, fast-twitch fibres and a reduction in oxidative capacity of Type I and IIb fibres in male offspring, as well as reduced cross-sectional area of all muscle fibre types (Type I, IIa, IIb/d) in both males and females at 33 days of age. None of these changes were observed in creatine + asphyxia animals. Thus, the changes in diaphragm fatigue and structure induced by birth asphyxia persist long-term but are prevented by maternal creatine supplementation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0149840
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082021

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.