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Dietary fat restriction increases fat taste sensitivity in people with obesity

Newman, Lisa P., Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P., Torres, Susan J. and Keast, Russell S.J. 2016, Dietary fat restriction increases fat taste sensitivity in people with obesity, Obesity, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 328-334, doi: 10.1002/oby.21357.

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Title Dietary fat restriction increases fat taste sensitivity in people with obesity
Author(s) Newman, Lisa P.
Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P.
Torres, Susan J.ORCID iD for Torres, Susan J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
Keast, Russell S.J.ORCID iD for Keast, Russell S.J. orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 328
End page 334
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1930-739X
Keyword(s) adult
diet, fat-restricted
female
food habits
food preferences
humans
male
middle aged
nutritional physiological phenomena
obesity
overweight
taste
taste perception
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
ACID SENSITIVITY
CONSUMPTION
THRESHOLDS
Summary OBJECTIVE: Individuals with obesity may be less sensitive to the taste of fat, and it is hypothesized that this is due to excess dietary fat intake. This study assessed the effect of a 6-week low-fat (LF) or portion control (PC) diet matched for weight loss on fat taste thresholds, fat perception, and preference in people with overweight/obesity.

METHODS: Participants (n = 53) completed a randomized dietary intervention and consumed either a LF diet (25% fat) or PC diet (33% fat) for 6 weeks. Fat taste thresholds (lowest detectable fat concentration), fat perception (discrimination ability), preference, and anthropometry were assessed at baseline and week 6.

RESULTS: Consumption of a LF diet (n = 26) and PC diet (n = 27) reduced participants' weight (P < 0.001), with no significant differences between groups (LF, -2.9%, PC, -2.7%). Both diets resulted in a decrease in fat taste thresholds (P = 0.014), and the effect tended to be stronger in the LF diet vs. the PC diet (P = 0.060). The ability to perceive different fat concentrations in foods was increased after the LF diet only (P = 0.017); however, food preference did not change on either diet.

CONCLUSIONS: A PC and LF diet both increase fat taste sensitivity in people with overweight/obesity, with the strongest effect after the LF diet.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/oby.21357
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082291

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.