Openly accessible

Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

Serrano, Oscar, Lavery, Paul S., Duarte, Carlos M., Kendrick, Gary A., Calafat, Antoni, York, Paul, Steven, Andy and Macreadie, Peter 2016, Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?, Biogeosciences, vol. 13, no. 17, pp. 4915-4926, doi: 10.5194/bg-2015-598.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
macreadie-canmud-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.10MB 208

Title Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?
Author(s) Serrano, Oscar
Lavery, Paul S.
Duarte, Carlos M.
Kendrick, Gary A.
Calafat, Antoni
York, Paul
Steven, Andy
Macreadie, PeterORCID iD for Macreadie, Peter orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Journal name Biogeosciences
Volume number 13
Issue number 17
Start page 4915
End page 4926
Total pages 24
Publisher Capernicus Publications
Place of publication Göttingen, Germany
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1726-4189
1810-6285
Summary The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (Corg) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e. silt and clay), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between Corg and mud (i.e. silt and clay, particle sizes <63 μm) contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil Corg content. We also combined these data with the δ13C signatures of the soil Corg to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil Corg content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil Corg content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived Corg to the sedimentary Corg pool in these meadows. The relative high soil Corg contents with relatively low mud contents (i.e. mud-Corg saturation) together with significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter could overall disrupt the correlation expected between soil Corg and mud contents. This study shows that mud (i.e. silt and clay content) is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil Corg content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e. Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91% of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78% of the variability).
Language eng
DOI 10.5194/bg-2015-598
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060701 Phycology (incl Marine Grasses)
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083086

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 44 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 411 Abstract Views, 208 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 29 Apr 2016, 10:57:11 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.