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Associations between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms in mothers with young children

Teychenne, Megan and Hinkley, Trina 2016, Associations between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms in mothers with young children, PLoS one, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0155696.

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Title Associations between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms in mothers with young children
Author(s) Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Article ID e0155696
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016-05-18
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Anxiety
Women
Mothers
Sedentary behaviour
Screen-based sedentary behaviour
Anxiety symptoms
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology
Physical activity
Depressive disorders
Mental health
Summary Objectives
Anxiety is a serious illness and women (including mothers with young children) are at particular risk. Although physical activity (PA) may reduce anxiety risk, little research has investigated the link between sedentary behaviour and anxiety risk. The aim of this study was to examine the association between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms, independent of PA, amongst mothers with young children.

Methods
During 2013–2014, 528 mothers with children aged 2–5 years completed self-report measures of recreational screen-based sedentary behaviour (TV/DVD/video viewing, computer/e-games/hand held device use) and anxiety symptoms (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS-A). Linear regression analyses examined the cross-sectional association between screen-based sedentary behaviour and anxiety symptoms.

Results
In models that adjusted for key demographic and behavioural covariates (including moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA, MVPA), computer/device use (B = 0.212; 95% CI = 0.048, 0.377) and total screen time (B = 0.109; 95% CI = 0.014, 0.205) were positively associated with heightened anxiety symptoms. TV viewing was not associated with anxiety symptoms in either model.

Conclusions
Higher levels of recreational computer or handheld device use and overall screen time may be linked to higher risk of anxiety symptoms in mothers with young children, independent of MVPA. Further longitudinal and intervention research is required to determine temporal
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0155696
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Teychenne, Hinkley
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084119

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.