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A systematic review of the prevalence of sedentary behavior during the after-school period among children aged 5-18 years

Arundell, Lauren, Fletcher, Elly, Salmon, Jo, Veitch, Jenny and Hinkley, Trina 2016, A systematic review of the prevalence of sedentary behavior during the after-school period among children aged 5-18 years, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 13, Article number: 93, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0419-1.

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Title A systematic review of the prevalence of sedentary behavior during the after-school period among children aged 5-18 years
Author(s) Arundell, LaurenORCID iD for Arundell, Lauren orcid.org/0000-0002-8178-4104
Fletcher, EllyORCID iD for Fletcher, Elly orcid.org/0000-0003-3958-9599
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 13
Season Article number: 93
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08-22
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) children
adolescents
sedentary behavior
after-school hours
prevalence
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Summary BACKGROUND: Independent of physical activity levels, youth sedentary behaviors (SB) have negative health outcomes. SB prevalence estimates during discretionary periods of the day (e.g., after-school), inform the need for targeted period-specific interventions. This systematic review aimed to determine children's and adolescents' SB prevalence during the after-school period.

METHODS: A computerized search was conducted in October 2015 (analysed November 2015). Inclusion criteria were: published in a peer-reviewed English journal; participants aged 5-18 years; measured overall after-school sedentary time (ST) objectively, and/or specific after-school SBs (e.g., TV viewing) objectively or subjectively; and provided the percentage of the after-school period spent in ST/SB or duration of behavior and period to calculate this. Where possible, findings were analyzed by location (e.g., after-school care/'other' locations). The PRISMA guidelines were followed.

RESULTS: Twenty-nine studies were included: 24 included children (≤12 years), four assessed adolescents (>12 years) and one included both; 20 assessed ST and nine assessed SB. On average, children spent 41% and 51% of the after-school period in ST when at after-school care and other locations respectively. Adolescents spent 57% of the after-school period in ST. SBs that children and adolescents perform include: TV viewing (20% of the period), non-screen based SB (including homework; 20%), screen-based SB (including TV viewing; 18%), homework/academics (13%), motorised transport (12%), social SB (9%), and screen-based SB (excluding TV viewing; 6%).

CONCLUSION: Children spent up to half of the after-school period in ST and this is higher among adolescents. A variety of screen- and non-screen based SBs are performed after school, providing key targets for interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0419-1
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086020

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.