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Ecological meltdown in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland: two centuries of change in a coastal marine ecosystem

Thurstan, Ruth H. and Roberts, Callum M. 2010, Ecological meltdown in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland: two centuries of change in a coastal marine ecosystem, PLoS one, vol. 5, no. 7, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011767.

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Title Ecological meltdown in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland: two centuries of change in a coastal marine ecosystem
Author(s) Thurstan, Ruth H.ORCID iD for Thurstan, Ruth H. orcid.org/0000-0002-8045-1631
Roberts, Callum M.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 5
Issue number 7
Article ID e11767
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2010-07-29
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Ecology
Ecosystem
Fisheries
Flatfishes
Flounder
Gadus morhua
Oceans and Seas
Scotland
Summary BACKGROUND: The Firth of Clyde is a large inlet of the sea that extends over 100 km into Scotland's west coast.

METHODS: We compiled detailed fisheries landings data for this area and combined them with historical accounts to build a picture of change due to fishing activity over the last 200 years.

FINDINGS: In the early 19th century, prior to the onset of industrial fishing, the Firth of Clyde supported diverse and productive fisheries for species such as herring (Clupea harengus, Clupeidae), cod (Gadus morhua, Gadidae), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus, Gadidae), turbot (Psetta maxima, Scophthalmidae) and flounder (Platichthys flesus, Pleuronectidae). The 19th century saw increased demand for fish, which encouraged more indiscriminate methods of fishing such as bottom trawling. During the 1880s, fish landings began to decline, and upon the recommendation of local fishers and scientists, the Firth of Clyde was closed to large trawling vessels in 1889. This closure remained in place until 1962 when bottom trawling for Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus, Nephropidae) was approved in areas more than three nautical miles from the coast. During the 1960s and 1970s, landings of bottomfish increased as trawling intensified. The trawl closure within three nautical miles of the coast was repealed in 1984 under pressure from the industry. Thereafter, bottomfish landings went into terminal decline, with all species collapsing to zero or near zero landings by the early 21st century. Herring fisheries collapsed in the 1970s as more efficient mid-water trawls and fish finders were introduced, while a fishery for mid-water saithe (Pollachius virens, Gadidae) underwent a boom and bust shortly after discovery in the late 1960s. The only commercial fisheries that remain today are for Nephrops and scallops (Pecten maximus, Pectinidae).

SIGNIFICANCE: The Firth of Clyde is a marine ecosystem nearing the endpoint of overfishing, a time when no species remain that are capable of sustaining commercial catches. The evidence suggests that trawl closures helped maintain productive fisheries through the mid-20th century, and their reopening precipitated collapse of bottomfish stocks. We argue that continued intensive bottom trawling for Nephrops with fine mesh nets will prevent the recovery of other species. This once diverse and highly productive environment will only be restored if trawl closures or other protected areas are re-introduced. The Firth of Clyde represents at a small scale a process that is occurring ocean-wide today, and its experience serves as a warning to others.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0011767
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088121

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.