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The associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health among adolescents: a systematic review

Hoare, Erin, Milton, Karen, Foster, Charlie and Allender, Steven 2016, The associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health among adolescents: a systematic review, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 13, Article Number : 108, pp. 1-22, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0432-4.

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Title The associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health among adolescents: a systematic review
Author(s) Hoare, ErinORCID iD for Hoare, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6186-0221
Milton, Karen
Foster, Charlie
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 13
Season Article Number : 108
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10-08
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Adolescents
Mental health
Screen time
Sedentary behaviour
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
INTERNET USE
MEDIA USE
YOUNG ADOLESCENTS
SOCIAL NETWORKING
RISK BEHAVIORS
YOUTH
Summary BACKGROUND: With technological developments and modernised sedentary lifestyles has come an increase in diseases associated with inactivity such as obesity and other non-communicable diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that time spent sedentary may also interact with mental health. This systematic review examined the associations between sedentary behaviour and mental health problems among adolescents.

METHODS: This systematic review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, and applied a quality assessment tool for quantitative studies to identity best available evidence. Following stringent search strategy of the databases; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Health Source: Nursing and Academic Edition, MEDLINE, PsychARTICLES and PsycINFO, we identified 32 articles eligible for review.

RESULTS: All studies reported leisure screen time among adolescents, and two thirds of identified studies examined depressive symptomatology. Other mental health measures were; anxiety symptoms, self-esteem, suicide ideation, loneliness, stress, and psychological distress. Strong consistent evidence was found for the relationship between both depressive symptomatology and psychological distress, and time spent using screens for leisure. Moderate evidence supported the relationship between low self-esteem and screen use. Poorer mental health status was found among adolescents using screen time more than 2-3 h per day, and gender differences exist. Essential information was missing for quality of evidence including heterogeneity in mental health and screen time-based measures, and self-report data collection methods.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings are of particular significance given the global public health concern of lifestyle-attributed diseases and the possibility for novel approaches to mental health. Future research should examine the psychological impact of reducing time spent using screens for leisure among adolescents, whilst accounting for possible confounding factors such as physical activity and dietary behaviours. It is critical that the reciprocal relationship between lifestyle behaviours and mental health is represented in both the psychiatric and public health forum.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0432-4
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088864

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.