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Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?

Nelson, Tiffanie M., Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C., Brotman, Rebecca M., Ravel, Jacques, Walk, Seth T. and Yeoman, Carl J. 2015, Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 6, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2015.00253.

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Title Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?
Author(s) Nelson, Tiffanie M.ORCID iD for Nelson, Tiffanie M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5341-312X
Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C.
Brotman, Rebecca M.
Ravel, Jacques
Walk, Seth T.
Yeoman, Carl J.
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 6
Article ID 253
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-09
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) acid stress
polyamine
malodor
bacterial vaginosis
cadaverine
Summary Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder among reproductive age women. One clinical indicator of BV is a "fishy" odor. This odor has been associated with increases in several biogenic amines (BAs) that may serve as important biomarkers. Within the vagina, BA production has been linked to various vaginal taxa, yet their genetic capability to synthesize BAs is unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we show that relatively few vaginal taxa are predicted to be capable of producing BAs. Many of these taxa (Dialister, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Megasphaera, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella spp.) are more abundant in the vaginal microbial community state type (CST) IV, which is depleted in lactobacilli. Several of the major Lactobacillus species (L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri) were identified as possessing gene sequences for proteins predicted to be capable of putrescine production. Finally, we show in a small cross sectional study of 37 women that the BAs putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine are significantly higher in CST IV over CSTs I and III. These data support the hypothesis that BA production is conducted by few vaginal taxa and may be important to the outgrowth of BV-associated (vaginal dysbiosis) vaginal bacteria.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2015.00253
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089966

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.