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Mechanisms of brief contact interventions in clinical populations: a systematic review

Milner, Allison, Spittal, Matthew J., Kapur, Nav, Witt, Katrina, Pirkis, Jane and Carter, Greg 2016, Mechanisms of brief contact interventions in clinical populations: a systematic review, BMC Psychiatry, vol. 16, Article number: 194, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12888-016-0896-4.

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Title Mechanisms of brief contact interventions in clinical populations: a systematic review
Author(s) Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Spittal, Matthew J.
Kapur, Nav
Witt, Katrina
Pirkis, Jane
Carter, Greg
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 16
Season Article number: 194
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-06-08
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) brief contact interventions
self-harm
suicide
social support
help seeking
postcard
letters
phone calls
emergency department
Summary BACKGROUND: Brief Contact Interventions (BCIs) have been of increasing interest to suicide prevention clinicians, researchers and policy makers. However, there has been no systematic assessment into the mechanisms underpinning BCIs. The aim of the current paper is to provide a systematic review of the proposed mechanisms underpinning BCIs across trial studies.

METHOD: A systematic review was conducted of trials using BCIs (post-discharge telephone contacts; emergency or crisis cards; and postcard or letter contacts) for suicide or self-harm. Following PRISMA guidelines, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the reference lists of all past reviews in the area. Secondary searches of reference lists were undertaken.

RESULTS: Sixteen papers provided a description of possible mechanisms which we grouped into three main areas: social support; suicide prevention literacy, and; learning alternative coping behaviours. After assessment of the studies and considering the plausibility of mechanisms, we suggest social support and improved suicide prevention literacy are the most likely mechanisms underpinning BCIs.

CONCLUSION: Researchers need to better articulate and measure the mechanisms they believe underpin BCIs in trial studies. Understanding more about the mechanisms of BCIs' will inform the development of future interventions for self-harm and suicide.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0896-4
Field of Research 111711 Health Information Systems (incl Surveillance)
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090011

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.