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The validity of the SF-12 and SF-6D instruments in people living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya

Patel, Anik R., Lester, Richard T., Marra, Carlo A., van der Kop, Mia L., Ritvo, Paul, Engel, Lidia, Karanja, Sarah and Lynd, Larry D. 2017, The validity of the SF-12 and SF-6D instruments in people living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya, Health and quality of life outcomes, vol. 15, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12955-017-0708-7.

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Title The validity of the SF-12 and SF-6D instruments in people living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya
Author(s) Patel, Anik R.
Lester, Richard T.
Marra, Carlo A.
van der Kop, Mia L.
Ritvo, Paul
Engel, LidiaORCID iD for Engel, Lidia orcid.org/0000-0002-7959-3149
Karanja, Sarah
Lynd, Larry D.
Journal name Health and quality of life outcomes
Volume number 15
Article ID 143
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-07-17
ISSN 1477-7525
Keyword(s) HIV
Health state utility
Kiswahili
Quality of life
SF6D
Short-form 12
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
PREFERENCE-BASED MEASURE
SF-36 HEALTH SURVEY
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
KISWAHILI VERSION
INFECTION
TANZANIA
SAMPLE
TESTS
Summary BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and health state utility value (HSUV) measurements are vital components of healthcare clinical and economic evaluations. Accurate measurement of HSUV and HRQoL require validated instruments. The 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) is one of few instruments that can evaluate both HRQoL and HSUV, but its validity has not been assessed in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in east Africa, where the burden of HIV is high.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study used baseline data from a randomized trial involving PLWHA in Kenya. Data included responses from a translated and adapted SF-12 survey as well as key demographic and clinical data. Construct validity of the survey was examined by testing the SF-12's ability to distinguish between groups known in advance to have differences in their health based on their disease severity. We classified disease severity based on established definitions from the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) and WHO, as well as a previously studied viral load threshold. T-tests and ANOVA were used to test for differences in HRQoL and HSUV scores. Area under the receive operator curve (AUC) was used to test the discriminative ability of the HRQoL and HSUV instruments.

RESULTS: Differences in physical component scores met the minimum clinically important difference among participants with more advanced HIV when defined by CD4 count (4.3 units) and WHO criteria (compared to stage 1, stages 2, 3 and 4 were 2.0, 7.2 and 9.8 units lower respectively). Mental score differences met the minimum clinically important difference between WHO stage 1 and stage 4 patients (4.4). Differences in the HSUV were statistically lower in more advanced HIV by all three definitions of severity. The AUC showed poor to weak discriminatory ability in most analyses, but had fair discriminatory ability between WHO clinical stage 1 and clinical stage 4 individuals (AUC = 0.71).

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the Kiswahili translated and adapted version of the SF-12 could be used as an assessment tool for physical health, mental health and HSUV for Kiswahili-speaking PLHWA.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12955-017-0708-7
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101670

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.