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Food consumption patterns of adolescents aged 14-16 years in Kolkata, India

Rathi, Neha, Riddell, Lynn and Worsley, Anthony 2017, Food consumption patterns of adolescents aged 14-16 years in Kolkata, India, Nutrition journal, vol. 16, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12937-017-0272-3.

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Title Food consumption patterns of adolescents aged 14-16 years in Kolkata, India
Author(s) Rathi, NehaORCID iD for Rathi, Neha orcid.org/0000-0002-6098-1723
Riddell, LynnORCID iD for Riddell, Lynn orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
Worsley, AnthonyORCID iD for Worsley, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Journal name Nutrition journal
Volume number 16
Article ID 50
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-24
ISSN 1475-2891
Keyword(s) adolescents
food habits
gender
India
science and technology
life sciences and biomedicine
nutrition and dietetics
gender differences
dietary intake
Australian children
physical activity
you adults
Summary BACKGROUND: The nutrition transition has brought about rapid changes in the structure of the Indian diet. The replacement of traditional home-cooked meals with ready-to-eat, processed foods has contributed to an increased risk of chronic diseases in urban Indians. Improving the nutrition of Indians by promoting healthy food consumption in early life and in adolescence would help to reduce these health risks. However, little is known about the quality and quantity of foods and beverages consumed by urban Indian adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the food consumption patterns in a sample of urban Indian adolescents.

METHODS: A self-administered, semi-quantitative, 59-item meal-based food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to assess the dietary intake of adolescents over the previous day. A total of 1026 students (aged 14-16 years) attending private, English-speaking schools in Kolkata, India completed the survey.

RESULTS: Overall, the adolescents reported poor dietary intakes; over one quarter (30%) reported no consumption of vegetables and 70% reported eating three or more servings of energy-dense snacks, on the previous day. Nearly half of the respondents (45%) did not consume any servings of fruits and 47% reported drinking three or more servings of energy-dense beverages. The mean consumption of food groups in serves/day varied from 0.88 (SD = 1.36) for pulses and legumes to 6.25 (SD = 7.22) for energy-dense snacks. In general, girls had more nutritious dietary intakes than boys.

CONCLUSIONS: The Indian adolescents reported poor food consumption patterns, and these findings highlight the need to design effective nutrition promotion strategies to encourage healthy eating in adolescence and targeting food supply and availability.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0272-3
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102583

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.