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Open Data requirements for applied ecology and conservation: case study of a wide-ranging marine vertebrate

Schofield, Gail 2017, Open Data requirements for applied ecology and conservation: case study of a wide-ranging marine vertebrate, Ethics in science and environmental politics, vol. 17, pp. 19-27, doi: 10.3354/esep00174.

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Title Open Data requirements for applied ecology and conservation: case study of a wide-ranging marine vertebrate
Author(s) Schofield, GailORCID iD for Schofield, Gail orcid.org/0000-0002-8438-4181
Journal name Ethics in science and environmental politics
Volume number 17
Start page 19
End page 27
Total pages 9
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2017-06-08
ISSN 1863-5415
1611-8014
Keyword(s) open access
open data
data integration
modelling
species extinction
wildlife
natural resource management
Summary Wide-ranging animals often traverse more than one country, making it important toestablish international management co-operations and agreed protocols; however, accessing allavailable information on a given species, or even a population of interest, compiled by local,national and international organisations is often complicated. In the case of sea turtles, this issueis further compounded because different life stages of the same population occupy different typesof habitat; even as adults, while part of the population aggregates to breed at a single site in agiven year, all other adult individuals are dispersed across foraging habitats in distance. Informationon the number of individuals, movement patterns and habitat use are needed to: (1) identify,select and conserve key breeding, foraging and developmental habitat effectively, (2) developrealistic models to predict current and future threat status of animals as accurately as possible, and(3) mitigate pressures operating in distant areas that, otherwise, might not be detected or linkedto the population of interest. Here, I use sea turtles as a case study to show how our current knowledgeon wide-ranging marine species is currently incomplete and, in many cases, disjointed. Inparticular, different techniques are often used to assimilate different types of information in differentsettings for different purposes (e.g. mark-recapture, genetics, strandings and nesting data).Ultimately, opening access to these data sources would facilitate major advances in research, aswell as the transfer of knowledge and information to practitioners, allowing the effective implementationof conservation management.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esep00174
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050199 Ecological Applications not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103132

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.