The quitting rollercoaster: how recent quitting history affects future cessation outcomes (data from the international tobacco control 4-country cohort study)

Partos, Timea R, Borland, Ron, Yong, Hua-Hie, Hyland, Andrew and Cummings, K Michael 2013, The quitting rollercoaster: how recent quitting history affects future cessation outcomes (data from the international tobacco control 4-country cohort study), Nicotine and tobacco research, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 1578-1587, doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntt025.

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Title The quitting rollercoaster: how recent quitting history affects future cessation outcomes (data from the international tobacco control 4-country cohort study)
Author(s) Partos, Timea R
Borland, Ron
Yong, Hua-HieORCID iD for Yong, Hua-Hie orcid.org/0000-0001-8167-6173
Hyland, Andrew
Cummings, K Michael
Journal name Nicotine and tobacco research
Volume number 15
Issue number 9
Start page 1578
End page 1587
Total pages 10
Publisher Oxford Academic
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2013-09-01
ISSN 1462-2203
1469-994X
Summary Introduction: Most smokers have a history of unsuccessful quit attempts. This study used data from 7 waves (2002-2009) of the International Tobacco Control 4-country cohort study to examine the role of smokers' quitting history (e.g., recency, length, and number of previous quit attempts) on their subsequent likelihood of making a quit attempt and achieving at least 6 months of sustained abstinence. Methods: Generalized estimating equations were used, allowing for estimation of relationships between variables across repeated observations while controlling for correlations from multiple responses by the same individual (29,682 observations from 13,417 individuals). Results: The likelihood of a future quit attempt increased independently with recency and number of prior attempts. By contrast, the likelihood of achieving sustained abstinence of at least 6 months was reduced for smokers with a failed quit attempt within the last year (15.1% vs. 27.1% for those without, p < .001). Two or more failed attempts (vs. only one) in the previous year were also associated with a lower likelihood of achieving sustained abstinence (OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.38-0.85). Effects persisted after controlling for levels of addiction, self-efficacy to quit, and use of stop-smoking medications. Conclusions: There appears to be a subset of smokers who repeatedly attempt but fail to remain abstinent from tobacco. Understanding why repeated attempts might be less successful in the long term is an important research priority because it implies a need to tailor treatment approaches for those who are motivated to quit but persistently relapse back to smoking.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntt025
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1103 Clinical Sciences
1505 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108373

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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