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Highly disturbed populations of seagrass show increased resilience but lower genotypic diversity

Connolly, Rod M., Smith, Timothy M., Maxwell, Paul S., Olds, Andrew D., Macreadie, Peter I. and Sherman, Craig D. H. 2018, Highly disturbed populations of seagrass show increased resilience but lower genotypic diversity, Frontiers in plant science, vol. 9, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3389/fpls.2018.00894.

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Title Highly disturbed populations of seagrass show increased resilience but lower genotypic diversity
Author(s) Connolly, Rod M.
Smith, Timothy M.ORCID iD for Smith, Timothy M. orcid.org/0000-0001-8612-8600
Maxwell, Paul S.
Olds, Andrew D.
Macreadie, Peter I.ORCID iD for Macreadie, Peter I. orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Sherman, Craig D. H.ORCID iD for Sherman, Craig D. H. orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Journal name Frontiers in plant science
Volume number 9
Article ID 894
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-06
ISSN 1664-462X
Keyword(s) Zostera muelleri
disturbance
genotypic diversity
resilience
seagrass
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Plant Sciences
GENETIC DIVERSITY
LOCAL ADAPTATION
ZOSTERA-MUELLERI
NATURAL-POPULATIONS
COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS
POSIDONIA-OCEANICA
PLANT
MEADOWS
COMPLEMENTARITY
METAANALYSIS
Summary The response of seagrass systems to a severe disturbance provides an opportunity to quantify the degree of resilience in different meadows, and subsequently to test whether there is a genetic basis to resilience. We used existing data on levels of long-standing disturbance from poor water quality, and the responses of seagrass (Zostera muelleri) after an extreme flood event in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. Sites were grouped into high and low disturbance categories, in which seagrass showed high and low resilience, respectively, as determined by measuring rates of key feedback processes (nutrient removal, suppression of sediment resuspension, and algal grazing), and physiological and morphological traits. Theoretically, meadows with higher genotypic diversity would be expected to have greater resilience. However, because the more resilient meadows occur in areas historically exposed to high disturbance, the alternative is also possible, that selection will have resulted in a narrower, less diverse subset of genotypes than in less disturbed meadows. Levels of genotypic and genetic diversity (allelic richness) based on 11 microsatellite loci, were positively related (R2 = 0.58). Genotypic diversity was significantly lower at highly disturbed sites (R = 0.49) than at less disturbed sites (R = 0.61). Genotypic diversity also showed a negative trend with two morphological characteristics known to confer resilience on seagrass in Moreton Bay, leaf chlorophyll concentrations and seagrass biomass. Genetic diversity did not differ between disturbed and undisturbed sites. We postulate that the explanation for these results is historical selection for genotypes that confer protection against disturbance, reducing diversity in meadows that contemporarily show greater resilience.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpls.2018.00894
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111613

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.