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Monitoring and evaluation of disaster response efforts undertaken by local health departments: A rapid realist review

Gossip, K, Gouda, H, Lee, Yong Yi, Firth, S, Bermejo, R, Zeck, W and Jimenez Soto, E 2017, Monitoring and evaluation of disaster response efforts undertaken by local health departments: A rapid realist review, BMC Health Services Research, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2396-8.

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Title Monitoring and evaluation of disaster response efforts undertaken by local health departments: A rapid realist review
Author(s) Gossip, K
Gouda, H
Lee, Yong Yi
Firth, S
Bermejo, R
Zeck, W
Jimenez Soto, E
Journal name BMC Health Services Research
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Article ID 450
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-06-29
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Monitoring and evaluation
Disaster response
Health departments
Lessons learned
Rapid realist review
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
FRAMEWORK
EXERCISES
SERVICES
Summary Background: Local health departments are often at the forefront of a disaster response, attending to the immediate trauma inflicted by the disaster and also the long term health consequences. As the frequency and severity of disasters are projected to rise, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) efforts are critical to help local health departments consolidate past experiences and improve future response efforts. Local health departments often conduct M&E work post disaster, however, many of these efforts fail to improve response procedures. Methods: We undertook a rapid realist review (RRR) to examine why M&E efforts undertaken by local health departments do not always result in improved disaster response efforts. We aimed to complement existing frameworks by focusing on the most basic and pragmatic steps of a M&E cycle targeted towards continuous system improvements. For these purposes, we developed a theoretical framework that draws on the quality improvement literature to 'frame' the steps in the M&E cycle. This framework encompassed a M&E cycle involving three stages (i.e., document and assess, disseminate and implement) that must be sequentially completed to learn from past experiences and improve future disaster response efforts. We used this framework to guide our examination of the literature and to identify any context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configurations which describe how M&E may be constrained or enabled at each stage of the M&E cycle. Results: This RRR found a number of explanatory CMO configurations that provide valuable insights into some of the considerations that should be made when using M&E to improve future disaster response efforts. Firstly, to support the accurate documentation and assessment of a disaster response, local health departments should consider how they can: establish a culture of learning within health departments; use embedded training methods; or facilitate external partnerships. Secondly, to enhance the widespread dissemination of lessons learned and facilitate inter-agency learning, evaluation reports should use standardised formats and terminology. Lastly, to increase commitment to improvement processes, local health department leaders should possess positive leadership attributes and encourage shared decision making. Conclusion: This study is among the first to conduct a synthesis of the CMO configurations which facilitate or hinder M&E efforts aimed at improving future disaster responses. It makes a significant contribution to the disaster literature and provides an evidence base that can be used to provide pragmatic guidance for improving M&E efforts of local health departments. Trial registration: PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015023526.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2396-8
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0807 Library and Information Studies
1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30131929

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.