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Emotion, rationality, and decision-making: How to link affective and social neuroscience with social theory

Verweij, M, Senior, TJ, Domínguez D., Juan F. and Turner, R 2015, Emotion, rationality, and decision-making: How to link affective and social neuroscience with social theory, Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol. 9, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3389/fnins.2015.00332.

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Title Emotion, rationality, and decision-making: How to link affective and social neuroscience with social theory
Author(s) Verweij, M
Senior, TJ
Domínguez D., Juan F.ORCID iD for Domínguez D., Juan F. orcid.org/0000-0002-6715-1060
Turner, R
Journal name Frontiers in Neuroscience
Volume number 9
Article ID 332
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-09-22
ISSN 1662-4548
1662-453X
Keyword(s) affective and social neuroscience
social and political theory
somatic marker hypothesis
plural rationality
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
PREFRONTAL CORTEX
NEURAL RESPONSES
NEUROECONOMICS
FEELINGS
CULTURE
SELF
REPRESENTATIONS
PARTICIPANTS
COGNITION
Summary In this paper, we argue for a stronger engagement between concepts in affective and social neuroscience on the one hand, and theories from the fields of anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology on the other. Affective and social neuroscience could provide an additional assessment of social theories. We argue that some of the most influential social theories of the last four decades-rational choice theory, behavioral economics, and post-structuralism-contain assumptions that are inconsistent with key findings in affective and social neuroscience. We also show that another approach from the social sciences-plural rationality theory-shows greater compatibility with these findings. We further claim that, in their turn, social theories can strengthen affective and social neuroscience. The former can provide more precise formulations of the social phenomena that neuroscientific models have targeted, can help neuroscientists who build these models become more aware of their social and cultural biases, and can even improve the models themselves. To illustrate, we show how plural rationality theory can be used to further specify and test the somatic marker hypothesis. Thus, we aim to accelerate the much-needed merger of social theories with affective and social neuroscience.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnins.2015.00332
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015 Verweij, Senior, Domínguez D. and Turner
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30133955

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.