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Food retail environments in greater melbourne 2008–2016: Longitudinal analysis of intra-city variation in density and healthiness of food outlets

Needham, Cindy, Orellana, Liliana, Allender, Steven, Sacks, Gary, Blake, Miranda and Strugnell, Claudia 2020, Food retail environments in greater melbourne 2008–2016: Longitudinal analysis of intra-city variation in density and healthiness of food outlets, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 4, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17041321.

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Title Food retail environments in greater melbourne 2008–2016: Longitudinal analysis of intra-city variation in density and healthiness of food outlets
Author(s) Needham, Cindy
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Blake, MirandaORCID iD for Blake, Miranda orcid.org/0000-0002-0649-2320
Strugnell, ClaudiaORCID iD for Strugnell, Claudia orcid.org/0000-0001-5912-9720
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 4
Article ID 1321
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-02-19
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
food retail
food environment
diet
obesity
urban growth
PLANNING POLICY
URBAN
ACCESS
NEIGHBORHOODS
WEIGHT
STORES
ADULTS
PERTH
RISK
Summary Obesity prevalence is inequitably distributed across geographic areas. Food environments may contribute to health disparities, yet little is known about how food environments are evolving over time and how this may influence dietary intake and weight. This study aimed to analyse intra-city variation in density and healthiness of food outlets between 2008 and 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. Food outlet data were classified by location, type and healthiness. Local government areas (LGAs) were classified into four groups representing distance from the central business district. Residential population estimates for each LGA were used to calculate the density of food outlets per 10,000 residents. Linear mixed models were fitted to estimate the mean density and ratio of ‘healthy’ to ‘unhealthy’ food outlets and food outlet ‘types’ by LGA group over time. The number of food outlets increased at a faster rate than the residential population, driven by an increasing density of both ‘unhealthy’ and ‘healthy’ outlets. Across all years, ratios of ‘unhealthy’ to ‘healthy’ outlets were highest in LGAs located in designated Growth Areas. Melbourne’s metropolitan food environment is saturated by ‘unhealthy’ and ‘less healthy’ food outlets, relative to ‘healthy’ ones. Melbourne’s urban growth areas had the least healthy food environments.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17041321
Indigenous content off
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135479

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.