Body image self-consciousness and sexting among heterosexual and non-exclusively heterosexual individuals

Howard, Dominika, Klettke, Bianca, Clancy, Elizabeth, Fuelscher, Ian and Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew 2020, Body image self-consciousness and sexting among heterosexual and non-exclusively heterosexual individuals, New media and society, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1177/1461444820909469.

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Title Body image self-consciousness and sexting among heterosexual and non-exclusively heterosexual individuals
Author(s) Howard, DominikaORCID iD for Howard, Dominika orcid.org/0000-0002-7874-2616
Klettke, BiancaORCID iD for Klettke, Bianca orcid.org/0000-0003-4602-2435
Clancy, ElizabethORCID iD for Clancy, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-0167-7203
Fuelscher, IanORCID iD for Fuelscher, Ian orcid.org/0000-0002-4875-0105
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Journal name New media and society
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-03-16
ISSN 1461-4448
1461-7315
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Communication
Sexting
body image self-consciousness
LGBTQI plus
pressure
coercion
sexual risk-taking
sexual preoccupation
Summary This study sought to explore whether body image self-consciousness during sexual relations predicts whether and for what reasons individuals send sexts. A series of ordinal and binary logistic regression analyses revealed that increased body image self-consciousness during sexual relations predicted consensual but unwanted instances of sexting for men and women, a lower frequency of sending sexts among heterosexual individuals, and a lesser likelihood of sending sexts in order to flirt. Body image self-consciousness, however, was not predictive of sending sexts in general or sending sexts in order to ‘feel sexy’. This research provides support for the negative relationship between body image self-consciousness and sexual agency across gender, and suggests that individuals affected by body image anxieties might be prone to technology-mediated abuse. Study limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1461444820909469
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1902 Film, Television and Digital Media
2001 Communication and Media Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30135642

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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