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Traumatic injury and perceived injustice: Fault attributions matter in a "no-fault" compensation state

Ioannou, LJ, Cameron, PA, Gibson, SJ, Gabbe, BJ, Ponsford, J, Jennings, PA, Arnold, CA, Gwini, SM, Georgiou-Karistianis, N and Giummarra, MJ 2017, Traumatic injury and perceived injustice: Fault attributions matter in a "no-fault" compensation state, PLoS ONE, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178894.

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Title Traumatic injury and perceived injustice: Fault attributions matter in a "no-fault" compensation state
Author(s) Ioannou, LJ
Cameron, PA
Gibson, SJ
Gabbe, BJ
Ponsford, J
Jennings, PA
Arnold, CA
Gwini, SMORCID iD for Gwini, SM orcid.org/0000-0002-0295-4575
Georgiou-Karistianis, N
Giummarra, MJ
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 12
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2017-06-05
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Pain
Traumatic injury
Hospitals
Quality of life
Pain psychology
Socioeconomic aspects of health
Bone fracture
Mental health and psychiatry
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
CHRONIC PAIN
EXPERIENCE QUESTIONNAIRE
ORTHOPEDIC TRAUMA
SCALE DEVELOPMENT
WHIPLASH-INJURY
MENTAL-HEALTH
OUTCOMES
VALIDATION
DISABILITY
RISK
Summary Background: Traumatic injury can lead to loss, suffering and feelings of injustice. Previous research has shown that perceived injustice is associated with poorer physical and mental wellbeing in persons with chronic pain. This study aimed to identify the relative association between injury, compensation and pain-related characteristics and perceived injustice 12-months after traumatic injury. Methods: 433 participants were recruited from the Victorian Orthopedic Trauma Outcomes Registry and Victorian State Trauma Registry, and completed questionnaires at 12-14 months after injury as part of an observational cohort study. Using hierarchical linear regression we examined the relationships between baseline demographics (sex, age, education, comorbidities), injury (injury severity, hospital length of stay), compensation (compensation status, fault, lawyer involvement), and health outcomes (SF-12) and perceived injustice. We then examined how much additional variance in perceived injustice was related to worse pain severity, interference, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, kinesiophobia or disability.Results: Only a small portion of variance in perceived injustice was related to baseline demographics (especially education level), and injury severity. Attribution of fault to another, consulting a lawyer, health-related quality of life, disability and the severity of pain-related cognitions explained the majority of variance in perceived injustice. While univariate analyses showed that compensable injury led to higher perceptions of injustice, this did not remain significant when adjusting for all other factors, including fault attribution and consulting a lawyer. Conclusions: In addition to the "justice" aspects of traumatic injury, the health impacts of injury, emotional distress related to pain (catastrophizing), and the perceived impact of pain on activity (pain self-efficacy), had stronger associations with perceptions of injustice than either injury or pain severity. To attenuate the likelihood of poor recovery from injury, clinical interventions that support restoration of health-related quality of life, and adjustment to the impacts of trauma are needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0178894
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, Ioannou et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136135

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.