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Tools and analytic techniques to synthesise community knowledge in CBPR using computer-mediated participatory system modelling

Hayward, Joshua, Morton, Saraya, Johnstone, Michael, Creighton, Douglas and Allender, Steven 2020, Tools and analytic techniques to synthesise community knowledge in CBPR using computer-mediated participatory system modelling, npj Digital Medicine, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1038/s41746-020-0230-x.

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Title Tools and analytic techniques to synthesise community knowledge in CBPR using computer-mediated participatory system modelling
Author(s) Hayward, JoshuaORCID iD for Hayward, Joshua orcid.org/0000-0001-8484-9930
Morton, Saraya
Johnstone, MichaelORCID iD for Johnstone, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-3005-8911
Creighton, DouglasORCID iD for Creighton, Douglas orcid.org/0000-0002-9217-1231
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Journal name npj Digital Medicine
Volume number 3
Issue number 1
Article ID 22
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication New York N.Y.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2398-6352
2398-6352
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Medical Informatics
obesity
society
Summary Participatory systems thinking methods are often used in community-based participatory research to engage and respond to complexity. Participation in systems thinking activities creates opportunities for participants to gain useful insights about complexity. It is desirable to design activities that extend the benefits of this participation into communities, as these insights are predictive of success in community-based prevention. This study tests an online, computer-mediated participatory system modelling platform (STICKE) and associated methods for collating and analysing its outputs. STICKE was trialled among a group of community members to test a computer-mediated system modelling exercise. The causal diagrams resulting from the exercise were then merged, and network analysis and DEMATEL methods applied to inform the generation of a smaller summary model to communicate insights from the participant group as a whole. Participants successfully completed the online modelling activity, and created causal diagrams consistent with expectations. The DEMATEL analysis was identified as the participant-preferred method for converging individuals causal diagrams into a coherent and useful summary. STICKE is an accessible tool that enabled participants to create causal diagrams online. Methods trialled in this study provide a protocol for combining and summarising individual causal diagrams that was perceived to be useful by the participant group. STICKE supports communities to consider and respond to complex problems at a local level, which is cornerstone of sustainable effective prevention. Understanding how communities perceive their own health challenges will be important to better support and inform locally owned prevention efforts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41746-020-0230-x
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136261

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.