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Golgi fragmentation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an overview of possible triggers and consequences

Sundaramoorthy, Vinod, Sultana, Jessica M. and Atkin, Julie D. 2015, Golgi fragmentation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an overview of possible triggers and consequences, Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fnins.2015.00400.

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Title Golgi fragmentation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an overview of possible triggers and consequences
Author(s) Sundaramoorthy, VinodORCID iD for Sundaramoorthy, Vinod orcid.org/0000-0001-6309-8031
Sultana, Jessica M.
Atkin, Julie D.
Journal name Frontiers in Neuroscience
Volume number 9
Article ID 400
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-10-27
ISSN 1662-453X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Golgi fragmentation
ER stress
axonal degeneration
secretory trafficking inhibition
autophagy dysfunction
ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM STRESS
PROTEIN-DISULFIDE-ISOMERASE
ANTERIOR HORN CELLS
CU,ZN SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE
NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTOR
MOTOR-NEURON DEGENERATION
SECRETORY PATHWAY
HIPPOCAMPAL-NEURONS
AXONAL-TRANSPORT
Summary Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which specifically targets motor neurons in the brain, brain stem and spinal cord. Whilst the etiology of ALS remains unknown, fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus is detected in ALS patient motor neurons and in animal/cellular disease models. The Golgi is a highly dynamic organelle that acts as a dispatching station for the vesicular transport of secretory/transmembrane proteins. It also mediates autophagy and maintains endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and axonal homeostasis. Both the trigger for Golgi fragmentation and the functional consequences of a fragmented Golgi apparatus in ALS remain unclear. However, recent evidence has highlighted defects in vesicular trafficking as a pathogenic mechanism in ALS. This review summarizes the evidence describing Golgi fragmentation in ALS, with possible links to other disease processes including cellular trafficking, ER stress, defective autophagy, and axonal degeneration.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnins.2015.00400
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Sundaramoorthy, Sultana and Atkin
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136634

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.