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Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Australian football: Should women and girls be playing? You're asking the wrong question

Fox, Aaron, Bonacci, Jason, Hoffmann, Samantha, Nimphius, S and Saunders, Natalie 2020, Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Australian football: Should women and girls be playing? You're asking the wrong question, BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, vol. 6, no. 1, doi: 10.1136/bmjsem-2020-000778.

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Title Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Australian football: Should women and girls be playing? You're asking the wrong question
Author(s) Fox, AaronORCID iD for Fox, Aaron orcid.org/0000-0002-5639-6388
Bonacci, JasonORCID iD for Bonacci, Jason orcid.org/0000-0002-4333-3214
Hoffmann, SamanthaORCID iD for Hoffmann, Samantha orcid.org/0000-0001-8824-7531
Nimphius, S
Saunders, NatalieORCID iD for Saunders, Natalie orcid.org/0000-0001-9177-5896
Journal name BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Article ID ARTN e000778
Total pages 3
Publisher BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
Place of publication England
Publication date 2020-04-09
ISSN 2055-7647
2055-7647
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Sport Sciences
NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL
LANDING BIOMECHANICS
15 SPORTS
RISK
DANCERS
SEX
Australian football
anterior cruciate ligament
female
injury
Summary Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have been a rising concern in the early years of the women’s Australian Football League (AFLW), eliciting headlines of a ‘knee crisis’ surrounding the league. There has been a focus on female biology as the primary factor driving the high rate of ACL injuries in the AFLW. Emphasising Australian football (AF) as being dangerous predominantly due to female biology may be misrepresenting a root cause of the ACL injury problem, perpetuating gender stereotypes that can restrict physical development and participation of women and girls in the sport. We propose that an approach addressing environmental and sociocultural factors, along with biological determinants, is required to truly challenge the ACL injury problem in the AFLW. Sports science and medicine must therefore strive to understand the whole system of women in AF, and question how to address inequities for the benefit of the athletes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjsem-2020-000778
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136732

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.