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Exercising Caution Upon Waking–Can Exercise Reduce Sleep Inertia?

Kovac, K, Ferguson, SA, Paterson, JL, Aisbett, Brad, Hilditch, CJ, Reynolds, AC and Vincent, GE 2020, Exercising Caution Upon Waking–Can Exercise Reduce Sleep Inertia?, Frontiers in Physiology, vol. 11, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2020.00254.

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Title Exercising Caution Upon Waking–Can Exercise Reduce Sleep Inertia?
Author(s) Kovac, K
Ferguson, SA
Paterson, JL
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Hilditch, CJ
Reynolds, AC
Vincent, GE
Journal name Frontiers in Physiology
Volume number 11
Article ID 254
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-04-07
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) exercise
sleep inertia
waking
cortisol awakening response
thermoregulation
cerebral blood flow
functional connectivity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
CEREBRAL-BLOOD-FLOW
COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
BODY-TEMPERATURE
GRADED-EXERCISE
CORTISOL-LEVELS
BRAIN ACTIVITY
ON-CALL
INTENSITY
TIME
CAFFEINE
Summary Sleep inertia, the transitional state of reduced alertness and impaired cognitive performance upon waking, is a safety risk for on-call personnel who can be required to perform critical tasks soon after waking. Sleep inertia countermeasures have previously been investigated; however, none have successfully dissipated sleep inertia within the first 15 min following waking. During this time, on-call personnel could already be driving, providing advice, or performing other safety-critical tasks. Exercise has not yet been investigated as a sleep inertia countermeasure but has the potential to stimulate the key physiological mechanisms that occur upon waking, including changes in cerebral blood flow, the cortisol awakening response, and increases in core body temperature. Here, we examine these physiological processes and hypothesize how exercise can stimulate them, positioning exercise as an effective sleep inertia countermeasure. We then propose key considerations for research investigating the efficacy of exercise as a sleep inertia countermeasure, including the need to determine the intensity and duration of exercise required to reduce sleep inertia, as well as testing the effectiveness of exercise across a range of conditions in which the severity of sleep inertia may vary. Finally, practical considerations are identified, including the recommendation that qualitative field-based research be conducted with on-call personnel to determine the potential constraints in utilizing exercise as a sleep inertia countermeasure in real-world scenarios.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2020.00254
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0606 Physiology
1116 Medical Physiology
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Kovac, Ferguson, Paterson, Aisbett, Hilditch, Reynolds and Vincent
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136867

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.