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Using the health literacy questionnaire (HLQ) with providers in the early intervention setting: A qualitative validity testing study

Leslie, Catherine J., Hawkins, Melanie and Smith, Diane L. 2020, Using the health literacy questionnaire (HLQ) with providers in the early intervention setting: A qualitative validity testing study, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 7, Special Issue Health Literacy and Equity – Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Recent Trends in Health Literacy Research and Action around the World, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17072603.

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Title Using the health literacy questionnaire (HLQ) with providers in the early intervention setting: A qualitative validity testing study
Author(s) Leslie, Catherine J.
Hawkins, MelanieORCID iD for Hawkins, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0001-5704-0490
Smith, Diane L.
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 7
Season Special Issue Health Literacy and Equity – Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Recent Trends in Health Literacy Research and Action around the World
Article ID 2603
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-04
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
validity
early intervention
Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ)
health literacy
CARE
ARGUMENT
OUTCOMES
Summary More than one in four parents in the United States of America (USA) have low health literacy, which is associated with reduced health equity and negatively impacts child health outcomes. Early intervention (EI) programs are optimally placed to build the health literacy capacity of caregivers, which could improve health equity. The health literacy of interdisciplinary EI providers has not previously been measured. This study used the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) with EI providers (n = 10) to investigate evidence based on response (cognitive) processes. Narratives from cognitive interviews gave reasons for HLQ score choices, and concordance and discordance between HLQ item intent descriptions and narrative data were assessed using thematic analysis. Results found scales with highest concordance for Scales 3, 6, and 9 (each 96%, n = 24). Concordance was lowest on Scale 5 (88%, n = 22), although still strong with only 12% discordance. Three themes reflecting discordance were identified: (1) Differences between Australian and USA culture/health systems; (2) Healthcare provider perspective; and (3) Participants with no health problems to manage. Results show strong concordance between EI providers’ narrative responses and item intents. Study results contribute validity evidence for the use of HLQ data to inform interventions that build health literacy capacity of EI providers to then empower and build the health literacy of EI parents.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17072603
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136884

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.