Openly accessible

A new method for measuring glenoid version on standard magnetic resonance imaging

Maister, Nicholas J, Hely, Andrew, Twycross, Liam G, Gill, Stephen D and Page, Richard S 2020, A new method for measuring glenoid version on standard magnetic resonance imaging, Journal of shoulder and elbow arthroplasty, vol. 4, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1177/2471549220926826.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title A new method for measuring glenoid version on standard magnetic resonance imaging
Author(s) Maister, Nicholas J
Hely, Andrew
Twycross, Liam G
Gill, Stephen DORCID iD for Gill, Stephen D orcid.org/0000-0001-8722-0572
Page, Richard SORCID iD for Page, Richard S orcid.org/0000-0002-2225-7144
Journal name Journal of shoulder and elbow arthroplasty
Volume number 4
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-01
ISSN 2471-5492
2471-5492
Keyword(s) chondrolabral
glenoid version
magnetic resonance imaging
reliability
shoulder
Summary Background The most effective method and modality for measuring glenoid version for different shoulder conditions is uncertain. Computed tomography (CT) imaging exposes the patient to radiation, and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not consistently image the entire scapula. This study investigates the reliability of a new method for assessing glenoid version using routine shoulder MRI. Methods MRI images of 20 patients undergoing arthroscopy for shoulder instability were independently assessed by 3 clinicians for osseous and chondrolabral glenoid version. To assess glenoid version, a line was drawn from medial corner of the glenoid body to midpoint of the glenoid face. A line perpendicular to this was the reference against which to measure glenoid version. Measurements were repeated after 3 months to assess intra- and interobserver reliability. Reliability was determined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results Interclass correlation coefficients showed at least good reliability for most estimates of intraobserver reliability (ICC ≥ .66) and excellent reliability for most estimates of interobserver reliability (ICC ≥ .84), with the exception of some inferior glenoid measurements where ICC was poor (ICC ≤.41). Discussion We propose that this new method of measuring glenoid on standard axial MRI can be used as a simple, practical, and reliable method in shoulder instability patients, which will reduce the requirement for CT in this group.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/2471549220926826
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137291

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 76 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 26 May 2020, 18:18:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.