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The effect of using mobile technology-based methods that record food or nutrient intake on diabetes control and nutrition outcomes: A systematic review

Porter, Judi, Huggins, CE, Truby, H and Collins, J 2016, The effect of using mobile technology-based methods that record food or nutrient intake on diabetes control and nutrition outcomes: A systematic review, Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/nu8120815.

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Title The effect of using mobile technology-based methods that record food or nutrient intake on diabetes control and nutrition outcomes: A systematic review
Author(s) Porter, JudiORCID iD for Porter, Judi orcid.org/0000-0002-7535-1919
Huggins, CE
Truby, H
Collins, J
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 8
Issue number 12
Article ID 815
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-12-17
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) mobile electronic devices
mobile applications
diabetes
nutrition outcomes
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
SELF-MANAGEMENT
TRIAL
INTERVENTIONS
LIFE
Summary (1) Background: Mobile technologies may be utilised for dietary intake assessment for people with diabetes. The published literature was systematically reviewed to determine the effect of using mobile electronic devices to record food or nutrient intake on diabetes control and nutrition outcomes; (2) Methods: The review protocol was registered with PROSPERO: registration number CRD42016050079, and followed PRISMA guidelines. Original research of mobile electronic devices where food or nutrient intake was recorded in people with diabetes with any treatment regimen, and where this intervention was compared with usual care or alternative treatment models, was considered. Quality was assessed using the Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research; (3) Results: Nine papers formed the final library with a range of interventions and control practices investigated. The food/nutrient intake recording component of the intervention and patient engagement with the technology was not well described. When assessed for quality, three studies rated positive, five were neutral and one negative. There was significantly greater improvement in HbA1c in the intervention group compared to the control group in four of the nine studies; (4) Conclusion: Based on the available evidence there are no clear recommendations for using technology to record dietary data in this population.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu8120815
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30138113

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.