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Characterization of Intervertebral Disc Changes in Asymptomatic Individuals with Distinct Physical Activity Histories Using Three Different Quantitative MRI Techniques

Belavy, Daniel, Brisby, H, Douglas, B, Hebelka, H, Quittner, MJ, Owen, Patrick, Rantalainen, Timo, Trudel, G and Lagerstrand, KM 2020, Characterization of Intervertebral Disc Changes in Asymptomatic Individuals with Distinct Physical Activity Histories Using Three Different Quantitative MRI Techniques, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, vol. 9, no. 6, doi: 10.3390/jcm9061841.

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Title Characterization of Intervertebral Disc Changes in Asymptomatic Individuals with Distinct Physical Activity Histories Using Three Different Quantitative MRI Techniques
Author(s) Belavy, DanielORCID iD for Belavy, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Brisby, H
Douglas, B
Hebelka, H
Quittner, MJ
Owen, PatrickORCID iD for Owen, Patrick orcid.org/0000-0003-3924-9375
Rantalainen, TimoORCID iD for Rantalainen, Timo orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Trudel, G
Lagerstrand, KM
Journal name JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE
Volume number 9
Issue number 6
Article ID ARTN 1841
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Switzerland
Publication date 2020-06-01
ISSN 2077-0383
2077-0383
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
intervertebral disc
magnetic resonance imaging
sport medicine
T2-mapping
Dixon
NUCLEUS PULPOSUS
DEGENERATION
CLASSIFICATION
Summary (1) Background: Assessments of intervertebral disc (IVD) changes, and IVD tissue adaptations due to physical activity, for example, remains challenging. Newer magnetic resonance imaging techniques can quantify detailed features of the IVD, where T2-mapping and T2-weighted (T2w) and Dixon imaging are potential candidates. Yet, their relative utility has not been examined. The performances of these techniques were investigated to characterize IVD differences in asymptomatic individuals with distinct physical activity histories. (2) Methods: In total, 101 participants (54 women) aged 25–35 years with distinct physical activity histories but without histories of spinal disease were included. T11/12 to L5/S1 IVDs were examined with sagittal T2-mapping, T2w and Dixon imaging. (3) Results: T2-mapping differentiated Pfirrmann grade-1 from all other grades (p < 0.001). Most importantly, T2-mapping was able to characterize IVD differences in individuals with different training histories (p < 0.005). Dixon displayed weak correlations with the Pfirrmann scale, but presented significantly higher water content in the IVDs of the long-distance runners (p < 0.005). (4) Conclusions: Findings suggested that T2-mapping best reflects IVD differences in asymptomatic individuals with distinct physical activity histories changes. Dixon characterized new aspects of IVD, probably associated with IVD hypertrophy. This complementary information may help us to better understand the biological function of the disc.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm9061841
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C4 Letter or note
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30138777

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.