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Priority-setting for obesity prevention—The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness of obesity prevention policies in Australia (ACE-Obesity Policy) study

Ananthapavan, Jaithri, Sacks, Gary, Brown, Victoria, Moodie, Marjory, Nguyen, Kim Phuong, Veerman, Lennert, Mantilla Herrera, Ana Maria, Lal, Anita, Peeters, Anna and Carter, Robert 2020, Priority-setting for obesity prevention—The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness of obesity prevention policies in Australia (ACE-Obesity Policy) study, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0234804.

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Title Priority-setting for obesity prevention—The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness of obesity prevention policies in Australia (ACE-Obesity Policy) study
Author(s) Ananthapavan, JaithriORCID iD for Ananthapavan, Jaithri orcid.org/0000-0002-5957-6931
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Brown, VictoriaORCID iD for Brown, Victoria orcid.org/0000-0003-2891-9476
Moodie, MarjoryORCID iD for Moodie, Marjory orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Nguyen, Kim Phuong
Veerman, Lennert
Mantilla Herrera, Ana MariaORCID iD for Mantilla Herrera, Ana Maria orcid.org/0000-0001-6921-6617
Lal, AnitaORCID iD for Lal, Anita orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-1586-5619
Carter, Robert
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2020-06-19
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) obesity
governments
food
Cost-effectiveness analysis
beverages
physical activity
weight gain
health economics
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
INTERVENTIONS
ADOLESCENTS
CHILDREN
LIFE
Summary The aim of the ACE-Obesity Policy study was to assess the economic credentials of a suite of obesity prevention policies across multiple sectors and areas of governance for the Australian setting. The study aimed to place the cost-effectiveness results within a broad decision-making context by providing an assessment of the key considerations for policy implementation. The Assessing Cost-Effectiveness (ACE) approach to priority-setting was used. Systematic literature reviews were undertaken to assess the evidence of intervention effectiveness on body mass index and/or physical activity for selected interventions. A standardised evaluation framework was used to assess the cost-effectiveness of each intervention compared to a ‘no intervention’ comparator, from a limited societal perspective. A multi-state life table Markov cohort model was used to estimate the long-term health impacts (quantified as health adjusted life years (HALYs)) and health care cost-savings resulting from each intervention. In addition to the technical cost-effectiveness results, qualitative assessments of implementation considerations were undertaken. All 16 interventions evaluated were found to be cost-effective (using a willingness-to-pay threshold of AUD50,000 per HALY gained). Eleven interventions were dominant (health promoting and cost-saving). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the non-dominant interventions ranged from AUD1,728 to 28,703 per HALY gained. Regulatory interventions tended to rank higher on their cost-effectiveness results, driven by lower implementation costs. However, the program-based policy interventions were generally based on higher quality evidence of intervention effectiveness. This comparative analysis of the economic credentials of obesity prevention policies for Australia indicates that there are a broad range of policies that are likely to be cost-effective, although policy options vary in strength of evidence for effectiveness, affordability, feasibility, acceptability to stakeholders, equity impact and sustainability. Implementation of these policies will require sustained co-ordination across jurisdictions and multiple government sectors in order to generate the predicted health benefits for the Australian population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0234804
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Ananthapavan et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139344

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.