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Attenuating pregnancy weight gain—what works and why: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Walker, R, Bennett, C, Blumfield, M, Gwini, S, Ma, J, Wang, F, Wan, Y and Truby, H 2018, Attenuating pregnancy weight gain—what works and why: A systematic review and meta-analysis, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 7, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.3390/nu10070944.

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Title Attenuating pregnancy weight gain—what works and why: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Walker, R
Bennett, C
Blumfield, M
Gwini, SORCID iD for Gwini, S orcid.org/0000-0002-0295-4575
Ma, J
Wang, F
Wan, Y
Truby, H
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 7
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-07-22
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) interventions
gestational weight gain
pregnancy
maternal
lifestyle
physical activity
diet
Summary Excessive maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) contributes to generational obesity. Our aim was to explore efficacy and intervention characteristics (trimester, duration, frequency, intensity, and delivery method) of interventions to prevent excessive GWG. CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Scopus were searched up to May 2018 (no date or language restrictions). Keywords and MeSH terms for diet, GWG, intervention, lifestyle, maternal, physical activity, and pregnancy were used to locate randomized-controlled trials (RCTs). The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias was applied. Eighty-nine RCTs were included. Meta-analysis (60 trials) estimated that women in diet only (WMD: −3.27; 95% CI: −4.96, −1.58, p < 0.01), physical activity (PA) (WMD: −1.02; 95% CI: −1.56, −0.49, p < 0.01), and lifestyle interventions (combining diet and PA) (WMD: −0.84; 95% CI: −1.29, −0.39, p < 0.01) gained significantly less weight than controls. The three eHealth interventions favored neither intervention nor control (WMD: −1.06; 95% CI: −4.13, 2.00, p = 0.50). Meta-regression demonstrated no optimal duration, frequency, intensity, setting, or diet type. Traditional face to face delivery of weight management interventions during pregnancy can be successful. Delivery via eHealth has potential to extend its reach to younger women but needs further evaluation of its success.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10070944
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139523

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.