Openly accessible

Renewing the New Order?: Public history in Indonesia

Ashton, Paul, Brahmantyo, Kresno and Keaney, Jaya 2012, Renewing the New Order?: Public history in Indonesia, Public history review, vol. 19, pp. 86-103, doi: 10.5130/phrj.v19i0.2837.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Renewing the New Order?: Public history in Indonesia
Author(s) Ashton, Paul
Brahmantyo, Kresno
Keaney, Jaya
Journal name Public history review
Volume number 19
Start page 86
End page 103
Total pages 18
Publisher U T S ePRESS
Place of publication sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1833-4989
Summary After the fall of the Suharto regime in 1988, public debates over the nature of history proliferated. While focusing on a number of key national events, most notably the 1965 coup and the killing of over half-a-million people, these debates have raised critical issues over the role or potential role of public history in contemporary Indonesian society. Questions of historical authority are paramount as Indonesian historians, public intellectuals and politicians struggle with a deeply entrenched historical paradigm and narratives of the old ‘New Order’ which continues to inform history in schools, cultural institutions, the media, literature, personal narratives, public rituals and the academy. This paradigm was based on an unquestioning acceptance of official accounts of the past. The demise of the New Order has left a historiographical vacuum which individuals and groups from a broad range of perspectives are trying to fill. Some, like Professor Azumardi Aza, are seeking to straddle the divide between professional and public history. Memory has emerged as a key issue in public debates, attempts have been made at reconciliation between the left and the right, though these faltered, and turf wars have broken out between historians and novelists such as Pramoedya Anata Toer. Women continue to remain relegated to a 'macabre footnote' in Indonesian public history. History in Indonesia is at a crossroads. One road could lead to a more democratic form of public or people’s history; the other to a modified version of the New Order history.
Language eng
DOI 10.5130/phrj.v19i0.2837
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 2102 Curatorial and Related Studies
2103 Historical Studies
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139824

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 15 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 10 Jul 2020, 14:41:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.