Access to dental care and dental ill-health of people with serious mental illness: Views of nurses working in mental health settings in Australia

Happell, B, Platania-Phung, C, Scott, David and Hanley, C 2015, Access to dental care and dental ill-health of people with serious mental illness: Views of nurses working in mental health settings in Australia, Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 32-37, doi: 10.1071/PY13044.

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Title Access to dental care and dental ill-health of people with serious mental illness: Views of nurses working in mental health settings in Australia
Author(s) Happell, B
Platania-Phung, C
Scott, DavidORCID iD for Scott, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5226-1972
Hanley, C
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Start page 32
End page 37
Total pages 6
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Primary Health Care
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
General & Internal Medicine
dental health
oral health
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
PHYSICAL HEALTH
ORAL-HEALTH
MEDICAL COMORBIDITY
POPULATION
SCHIZOPHRENIA
DISEASE
ADULTS
WOMEN
Summary People with serious mental illness experience higher rates of oral and dental health problems than the wider population. Little is known about how dental health is viewed or addressed by nurses working with mental health consumers. This paper presents the views of nurses regarding the nature and severity of dental health problems of consumers with serious mental illness, and how often they provide advice on dental health. Mental health sector nurses (n = 643) completed an online survey, including questions on dental and oral health issues of people with serious mental illness. The majority of nurses considered the oral and dental conditions of people with serious mental illness to be worse than the wider community. When compared with a range of significant physical health issues (e.g. cardiovascular disease), many nurses emphasised that dental and oral problems are one of the most salient health issues facing people with serious mental illness, their level of access to dental care services is severely inadequate and they suffer significantly worse dental health outcomes as a result. This study highlights the need for reforms to increase access to dental and oral health care for mental health consumers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY13044
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
16 Studies in Human Society
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139915

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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