Low knowledge of physical health behaviours is associated with poor diet and chronic illness in adults

Stanton, R, Scott, David and Happell, B 2016, Low knowledge of physical health behaviours is associated with poor diet and chronic illness in adults, Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 226-232, doi: 10.1071/PY14132.

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Title Low knowledge of physical health behaviours is associated with poor diet and chronic illness in adults
Author(s) Stanton, R
Scott, DavidORCID iD for Scott, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5226-1972
Happell, B
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health
Volume number 22
Issue number 3
Start page 226
End page 232
Total pages 7
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Primary Health Care
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
General & Internal Medicine
CHRONIC DISEASE
MENTAL-ILLNESS
LITERACY
ALCOHOL
POPULATION
Summary Governments invest heavily in health promotion strategies to improve physical health behaviours. However, the dietary and physical activity practices of many Australians fail to meet minimum levels for health, leading to the unacceptably high prevalence of chronic and complex illness. Health literacy is known to impact on health behaviour, and to be related to health knowledge; however, no studies have specifically examined knowledge of physical health behaviours in an Australian context. We assessed knowledge of physical health behaviours in 1244 adults in Queensland, Australia. Almost two-thirds of respondents had a ‘Good’ knowledge of physical health behaviour. People with ‘Good’ knowledge of physical health behaviours were more likely to be female, educated beyond secondary school, be employed and have an annual household income of >$52000 (P<0.05). People with ‘Low’ knowledge of physical health behaviours were significantly more likely to report insufficient intake of vegetables and have at least one chronic illness (P<0.05). Binary logistic regression shows low daily intake of vegetables to have the strongest association with low knowledge of physical health behaviours. Given the association between health knowledge and health literacy, assessment of the knowledge of physical health behaviours may provide considerable insight into the effectiveness of future health promotion interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY14132
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
16 Studies in Human Society
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139925

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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