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An Examination of Clinician Responses to Problem Gambling in Community Mental Health Services

Manning, V, Dowling, Nicole, Rodda, SN, Cheetham, A and Lubman, DI 2020, An Examination of Clinician Responses to Problem Gambling in Community Mental Health Services, Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 9, no. 7, pp. 2075-2075, doi: 10.3390/jcm9072075.

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Title An Examination of Clinician Responses to Problem Gambling in Community Mental Health Services
Author(s) Manning, V
Dowling, NicoleORCID iD for Dowling, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Rodda, SN
Cheetham, A
Lubman, DI
Journal name Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 7
Start page 2075
End page 2075
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-07-01
ISSN 2077-0383
Keyword(s) problem gambling
screening and assessment
comorbidity
clinician attitudes
clinical practice
Summary Gambling problems commonly co-occur with other mental health problems. However, screening for problem gambling (PG) rarely takes place within mental health treatment settings. The aim of the current study was to examine the way in which mental health clinicians respond to PG issues. Participants (n = 281) were recruited from a range of mental health services in Victoria, Australia. The majority of clinicians reported that at least some of their caseload was affected by gambling problems. Clinicians displayed moderate levels of knowledge about the reciprocal impact of gambling problems and mental health but had limited knowledge of screening tools to detect PG. Whilst 77% reported that they screened for PG, only 16% did so “often” or “always” and few expressed confidence in their ability to treat PG. However, only 12.5% reported receiving previous training in PG, and those that had, reported higher levels of knowledge about gambling in the context of mental illness, more positive attitudes about responding to gambling issues, and more confidence in detecting/screening for PG. In conclusion, the findings highlight the need to upskill mental health clinicians so they can better identify and manage PG and point towards opportunities for enhanced integrated working with gambling services.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm9072075
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140261

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.