Availability and placement of healthy and discretionary food in Australian supermarkets by chain and level of socio-economic disadvantage

Schultz, Sally, Cameron, Adrian J., Grigsby-Duffy, Lily, Robinson, Ella, Marshall, Josephine, Orellana, Liliana and Sacks, Gary 2021, Availability and placement of healthy and discretionary food in Australian supermarkets by chain and level of socio-economic disadvantage, Public Health Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 203-214, doi: 10.1017/S1368980020002505.

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Title Availability and placement of healthy and discretionary food in Australian supermarkets by chain and level of socio-economic disadvantage
Author(s) Schultz, Sally
Cameron, Adrian J.ORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Grigsby-Duffy, Lily
Robinson, EllaORCID iD for Robinson, Ella orcid.org/0000-0003-1960-0703
Marshall, JosephineORCID iD for Marshall, Josephine orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-3927
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 203
End page 214
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021-02
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Discretionary food marketing
Food environment
Foodretail environment
Supermarket
Unhealthy food marketing
Summary Objective:The current study aimed to investigate availability and placement of healthy and discretionary (less healthy) food in supermarkets in Victoria, Australia, and examine variation by supermarket chain and area-level socio-economic disadvantage.Design:Cross-sectional supermarket audit. Measures included: (i) proportion of shelf space (in square metres) allocated to selected healthy and discretionary food and beverages; (ii) proportion of end-of-aisle, checkout and island bin displays containing discretionary food and beverages and (iii) proportion of space within end-of-aisle, checkout and island bin displays devoted to discretionary food and beverages.Setting:Metropolitan areas of Melbourne and Geelong, Australia. Assessment: June–July 2019.Participants:Random sample of 104 stores, with equal numbers from each supermarket group (Coles, Woolworths, Aldi and Independent stores) within strata of area-level socio-economic position.Results:Proportion of shelf space devoted to selected discretionary foods was greater for Independent stores (72·7 %) compared with Woolworths (65·7 %), Coles (64·8 %) and Aldi (63·2 %) (all P < 0·001). Proportion of shelf space devoted to selected discretionary food for all Coles, Woolworths and Aldi stores was 9·7 % higher in the most compared with the least disadvantaged areas (P = 0·002). Across all stores, 90 % of staff-assisted checkout displays and 50 % of end-of-aisle displays included discretionary food. Aldi was less likely to feature discretionary food in end-of-aisle and checkout displays compared with other supermarket groups.Conclusions:Extensive marketing of discretionary food in all Australian supermarket chains was observed, which is likely to strongly influence purchasing patterns and population diets. Findings should be used to inform private and public sector policies to reduce marketing of discretionary food in supermarkets.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980020002505
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140885

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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