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Open knowledge commons versus privatized gain in a fractured information ecology: lessons from COVID-19 for the future of sustainability

Hensher, Martin, Kish, K, Farley, J, Quilley, S and Zywert, K 2020, Open knowledge commons versus privatized gain in a fractured information ecology: lessons from COVID-19 for the future of sustainability, Global sustainability, vol. 3, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1017/sus.2020.21.

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Title Open knowledge commons versus privatized gain in a fractured information ecology: lessons from COVID-19 for the future of sustainability
Author(s) Hensher, MartinORCID iD for Hensher, Martin orcid.org/0000-0001-6444-6827
Kish, K
Farley, J
Quilley, S
Zywert, K
Journal name Global sustainability
Volume number 3
Article ID e26
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2059-4798
Keyword(s) COVID-19
information ecology
innovation
intellectual property
knowledge commons
patents
Summary Abstract COVID-19 has shone a bright light on a number of failings and weaknesses in how current economic models handle information and knowledge. Some of these are familiar issues that have long been understood but not acted upon effectively – for example, the danger that current systems of intellectual property and patent protection are actually inimical to delivering a cost-effective vaccine available to all, whereas treating knowledge as a commons and a public good is much more likely to deliver efficient outcomes for the entire global population. But COVID-19 has also demonstrated that traditional models of knowledge production and dissemination are failing us; scientific knowledge is becoming weaponized and hyper-partisan, and confidence in this knowledge is falling. We believe that the challenges that COVID-19 has exposed in the information economy and ecology will be of increasing applicability across the whole spectrum of sustainability; sustainability scholars and policymakers need to understand and grasp them now if we are to avoid contagion into other sectors due to the preventable errors that have marred the global response to COVID-19.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/sus.2020.21
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
110309 Infectious Diseases
160508 Health Policy
160510 Public Policy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141010

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
PVC's Office - Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.