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User perception of a smartphone app to promote physical activity through active transportation: inductive qualitative content analysis within the Smart City Active Mobile Phone Intervention (SCAMPI) study

Lindqvist, Anna-Karin, Rutberg, Stina, Söderström, Emmie, Ek, Anna, Alexandrou, Christina, Maddison, Ralph and Löf, Marie 2020, User perception of a smartphone app to promote physical activity through active transportation: inductive qualitative content analysis within the Smart City Active Mobile Phone Intervention (SCAMPI) study, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.2196/19380.

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Title User perception of a smartphone app to promote physical activity through active transportation: inductive qualitative content analysis within the Smart City Active Mobile Phone Intervention (SCAMPI) study
Author(s) Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
Rutberg, Stina
Söderström, Emmie
Ek, Anna
Alexandrou, Christina
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Löf, Marie
Journal name JMIR mHealth and uHealth
Volume number 8
Issue number 8
Article ID e19380
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher JMIR Publications Inc.
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 2291-5222
2291-5222
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Medical Informatics
behavior change
smartphone intervention
physical activity
user perception
active transportation
mobile app
inductive qualitative content analysis
mobile health
social cognitive theory
mHealth
Summary Background Physical inactivity is globally recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity, particularly the incidence of noncommunicable diseases. Increasing physical activity (PA) is therefore a public health priority. Engaging in active transportation (AT) is a viable approach for promoting daily PA levels. Mobile health interventions enable the promotion of AT to a larger population. The Smart City Active Mobile Phone Intervention (SCAMPI) study was a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the ability of a behavior change program delivered via a smartphone app to motivate participants to increase their PA by engaging in AT. Objective This qualitative study aims to examine the acceptance and user experience of the app promoting AT that was used in the SCAMPI trial (the TRavelVU Plus app). Methods A total of 17 residents of Stockholm County (13 women; age range 25-61 years) who completed the 3-month app-based behavioral change program (delivered through the TRavelVU Plus app) in the SCAMPI randomized controlled trial during 2018 agreed to participate in a semistructured telephone-based interview. These participants were well representative of the whole intervention group (n=127) in terms of baseline characteristics such as age, sex, and area of residence. The interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using an inductive qualitative content analysis. Results The content analysis revealed 2 themes and 4 subcategories. The first theme, “main motivators: monitoring and messages,” highlighted that monitoring AT and being able to set weekly goals using the app were the primary motivators reported by study participants. The second theme, “acceptable but modifiable,” reflects that the app was well accepted and effectively encouraged many participants to use more AT. Nevertheless, there were functions in the app that require modification. For example, while the semiautomated travel tracking feature was appreciated, participants found it time-consuming and unreliable at times. Conclusions This study contributes novel insight into adults’ experiences of using a mobile app to promote the use of AT. The results showed that the app was well accepted and that self-monitoring and goal setting were the main motivators to engage in more AT. The semiautomated tracking of AT was appreciated; however, it was also reported to be energy- and time-consuming when it failed to work. Thus, this feature should be improved going forward. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03086837; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03086837 International Registered Report Identifier (IRRID) RR2-10.1186/s12889-018-5658-4
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/19380
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141219

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.