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Energy density of new food products targeted to children

Azzopardi, Danielle J, Lacy, Kathleen E and Woods, Julie L 2020, Energy density of new food products targeted to children, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3390/nu12082242.

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Title Energy density of new food products targeted to children
Author(s) Azzopardi, Danielle J
Lacy, Kathleen EORCID iD for Lacy, Kathleen E orcid.org/0000-0002-2982-4455
Woods, Julie LORCID iD for Woods, Julie L orcid.org/0000-0002-2717-310X
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 8
Article ID 2242
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
energy density
health star rating
children
food supply
front-of-pack label
discretionary
Summary High dietary energy density (ED) is linked to childhood obesity and poor diet quality. The Australian Health Star Rating (HSR) system aims to assist consumers in making healthful food choices. This cross-sectional study used 2014–2018 data from the Mintel Global New Products Database to describe the ED of new food products targeted to children (5–12 years) released after the introduction of HSR and examine relationships between ED and HSR. Products were categorised by ED (low < 630 kJ/100 g, medium 630–950 kJ/100 g, high > 950 kJ/100 g) and HSR (no, HSR < 2.5 low, HSR ≥ 2.5 high). Non-parametric statistics were used to examine ED and HSR. A total of 548 products targeted children: 21% low, 5% medium, 74% high ED. One hundred products displayed an HSR: 24% low, 76% high; 53 products with both high HSR and ED. The EDs of products differed by HSR (p < 0.05), but both group’s medians (HSR < 2.5: 1850 kJ/100 g, HSR ≥ 2.5: 1507 kJ/100 g) were high. A high proportion of new products had a high ED, and the HSR of these foods did not consistently discriminate between ED levels, particularly for high ED foods. Policies to promote lower ED foods and better alignment between ED and HSR may improve childhood obesity and diet quality.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12082242
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141755

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.