Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and compression application: Review summary

Team, V, Gethin, G, Ivory, JD, Crawford, K, Bouguettaya, Ayoub and Weller, CD 2019, Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and compression application: Review summary, WOUND PRACTICE AND RESEARCH, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 108-111, doi: 10.33235/wpr.27.2.74-77.

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Title Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and compression application: Review summary
Author(s) Team, V
Gethin, G
Ivory, JD
Crawford, K
Bouguettaya, AyoubORCID iD for Bouguettaya, Ayoub orcid.org/0000-0002-5843-3533
Weller, CD
Journal name WOUND PRACTICE AND RESEARCH
Volume number 27
Issue number 2
Start page 108
End page 111
Total pages 4
Publisher CAMBRIDGE MEDIA
Publication date 2019-06-01
ISSN 1837-6304
2202-9729
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Dermatology
Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI)
clinical practice guidelines (CPG)
compression
content analysis
venous leg ulcers (VLUs)
VENOUS LEG ULCERS
GUIDELINES
MANAGEMENT
DIAGNOSIS
THERAPY
SOCIETY
Summary Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are a significant complication amongst persons with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) that frequently follow a cycle of healing and recurrence. Current clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) recommend applying below knee compression to improve VLU healing. Compression could be applied if the Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) rules out significant arterial disease, as sufficient peripheral arterial circulation is necessary to ensure safe compression use. We conducted a content analysis of 13 global CPGs on the accuracy of recommendations related to ABPI and compression application. Eight CPGs indicated that compression is recommended when the ABPI is between 0.8 and 1.2 mmHg. However, this review found there is disagreement between 13 global VLU CPGs, with a lack of clarity on whether or not compression is indicated for patients with ABPIs between 0.6 and 0.8 mmHg. Some CPGs recommend reduced compression for treatment of VLUs, while others do not recommend any type of compression at all. This has implications for when it is safe to apply compression, and the inconsistency in evidence indicates that specialist advice may be required at levels beyond the ABPI “safe” range listed above.
Language eng
DOI 10.33235/wpr.27.2.74-77
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1110 Nursing
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141816

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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