Openly accessible

"Happy feet": Evaluating the benefits of a 100-day 10,000 step challenge on mental health and wellbeing

Hallam, Karen, Bilsborough, S and de Courten, M 2018, "Happy feet": Evaluating the benefits of a 100-day 10,000 step challenge on mental health and wellbeing, BMC Psychiatry, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/s12888-018-1609-y.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hallam-happyfeet-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 400.58KB 33

Title "Happy feet": Evaluating the benefits of a 100-day 10,000 step challenge on mental health and wellbeing
Author(s) Hallam, KarenORCID iD for Hallam, Karen orcid.org/0000-0003-0495-5341
Bilsborough, S
de Courten, M
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 19
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01-24
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Depression
Stress
Anxiety
Wellbeing
Physical activity
Health promotion
STRESS SCALES DASS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
EXERCISE
RISK
INTERVENTION
SENSITIVITY
PROGRAMS
Summary Background: An increased awareness of the health benefits of walking has emerged with the development and refinement of accelerometer equipment. Evidence is beginning to highlight the value of promoting walking, particularly focusing on the Japanese mark of obtaining 10,000 steps per day. Workplace based step challenges have become popular to engage large cohorts in increasing their daily physical activity in a sustainable and enjoyable way. Findings are now highlighting the positive health effects of these medium-term programs (typically conducted over a few months) in terms of cardiovascular health, reducing diabetes risk and improving lifestyle factors such as weight and blood pressure. As yet, research has not focused on whether similar improvements in psychological health and wellbeing are present. Methods: This study investigated the impact of a 100-day, 10,000 step program on signs of depression, anxiety and stress as well as general wellbeing using standardised psychological scales. Results: The results indicated a small but consistent effect on all of these measures of mental health over the term of the program. This effect appeared irrespective of whether a person reached the 10,000 step mark. Conclusions: These results highlight improved mental health and wellbeing in people undertaking this 100-day 10,000 step program and indicates the efficacy and potential of these programs for a modest, yet important improvement in mental health. Notably, targets reached may be less important than participation itself.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-018-1609-y
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018 The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141831

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 65 Abstract Views, 33 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 11 Sep 2020, 15:42:18 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.