Total testosterone is not associated with lean mass or handgrip strength in pre-menopausal females: findings from the NHANES

Alexander, Sarah, Abbott, Gavin, Aisbett, Brad, Wadley, Glenn, Hnatiuk, Jill and Lamon, Severine 2020, Total testosterone is not associated with lean mass or handgrip strength in pre-menopausal females: findings from the NHANES, MedRxiv, doi: 10.1101/2020.08.04.20168542.


Title Total testosterone is not associated with lean mass or handgrip strength in pre-menopausal females: findings from the NHANES
Author(s) Alexander, SarahORCID iD for Alexander, Sarah orcid.org/0000-0002-2612-7769
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Wadley, GlennORCID iD for Wadley, Glenn orcid.org/0000-0002-6617-4359
Hnatiuk, JillORCID iD for Hnatiuk, Jill orcid.org/0000-0002-5754-7176
Lamon, SeverineORCID iD for Lamon, Severine orcid.org/0000-0002-3271-6551
Journal name MedRxiv
Publisher Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Publication date 2020-08-06
Summary Testosterone is a naturally occurring hormone that has been positively associated with lean mass and strength in males. Whether endogenous testosterone is related to lean mass and strength in females is unknown. Objective: To examine the relationship between endogenous testosterone concentration and lean mass and handgrip strength in healthy, pre-menopausal females.Methods: Secondary data from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used. Females were aged 18-40 (n=753, age 30 ± 6 yr, mean SD) and pre-menopausal. Multivariate linear regression models were used to examine associations between total testosterone, height-adjusted lean mass and handgrip strength. Results: Mean ± SD testosterone concentration was 1.0 ± 0.6 nmol·L-1 and mean free androgen index (FAI) was 0.02 ± 0.02. Mean fat-free mass index (FFMI) was 16.4 ± 3.0 kg·m-2 and mean handgrip strength was 61.7 ± 10.5 kg. In females, testosterone was not associated with FFMI (β=0.08; 95%CI: -0.02, 0.18; p=0.11) or handgrip strength (β=0.03; 95%CI: -0.11, 0.17; p=0.67) in a statistically significant manner. Conversely, FAI was positively associated with FFMI (β=0.17; 95%CI: 0.01, 0.33; p=0.04) but not handgrip strength (β=0.19; 95%CI: -0.02, 0.21; p=0.10). Conclusions: These findings indicate that FAI, but not total testosterone, is associated with FFMI in females. The small coefficients however suggest that FAI only accounts for a minor proportion of the variance in FFMI, highlighting the complexity of the regulation of lean mass in female physiology. FAI nor total testosterone are associated with handgrip strength in females when testosterone concentrations are not altered pharmacologically.
Language eng
DOI 10.1101/2020.08.04.20168542
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Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal
Copyright notice ┬ęGoogle title to check if it has been formally published. If so merge the records - lswan 14/07/2021
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30142364

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