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User experiences with a type 2 diabetes coaching app: qualitative study

Baptista, Shaira, Wadley, Greg, Bird, Dominique, Oldenburg, Brian and Speight, Jane 2020, User experiences with a type 2 diabetes coaching app: qualitative study, JMIR diabetes, vol. 5, no. 3, Jul-Sep, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.2196/16692.

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Title User experiences with a type 2 diabetes coaching app: qualitative study
Author(s) Baptista, Shaira
Wadley, Greg
Bird, Dominique
Oldenburg, Brian
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Journal name JMIR diabetes
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Season Jul-Sep
Article ID e16692
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher JMIR Publications Inc.
Place of publication Toronto, On.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2371-4379
2371-4379
Keyword(s) type 2 diabetes
mobile phone
mobile apps
mHealth
smartphone
self-management
Summary Background Diabetes self-management apps have the potential to improve self-management in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although efficacy trials provide evidence of health benefits, premature disengagement from apps is common. Therefore, it is important to understand the factors that influence engagement in real-world settings. Objective This study aims to explore users’ real-world experiences with the My Diabetes Coach (MDC) self-management app. Methods We conducted telephone-based interviews with participants who had accessed the MDC self-management app via their smartphone for up to 12 months. Interviews focused on user characteristics; the context within which the app was used; barriers and facilitators of app use; and the design, content, and delivery of support within the app. Results A total of 19 adults with T2D (8/19, 42% women; mean age 60, SD 14 years) were interviewed. Of the 19 interviewees, 8 (42%) had T2D for <5 years, 42% (n=8) had T2D for 5-10 years, and 16% (n=3) had T2D for >10 years. In total, 2 themes were constructed from interview data: (1) the moderating effect of diabetes self-management styles on needs, preferences, and expectations and (2) factors influencing users’ engagement with the app: one size does not fit all. Conclusions User characteristics, the context of use, and features of the app interact and influence engagement. Promoting engagement is vital if diabetes self-management apps are to become a useful complement to clinical care in supporting optimal self-management. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry CTRN126140012296; URL https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366925&isReview=true
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/16692
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143239

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.