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Modulation of functional network properties in major depressive disorder following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): a resting-state EEG analysis

Hill, A, Hadas, I, Zomorrodi, R, Voineskos, D, Farzan, F, Fitzgerald, PB, Blumberger, DM and Daskalakis, ZJ 2020, Modulation of functional network properties in major depressive disorder following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): a resting-state EEG analysis, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-74103-y.

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Title Modulation of functional network properties in major depressive disorder following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): a resting-state EEG analysis
Author(s) Hill, AORCID iD for Hill, A orcid.org/0000-0002-1435-2993
Hadas, I
Zomorrodi, R
Voineskos, D
Farzan, F
Fitzgerald, PB
Blumberger, DM
Daskalakis, ZJ
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 17057
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Nature Research
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2020-10-13
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
GRAPH-THEORETICAL ANALYSIS
HUMAN BRAIN NETWORKS
CORTICAL CONNECTIVITY
COGNITIVE DECLINE
SYNCHRONIZATION
ELECTROSHOCK
Summary Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective neuromodulatory intervention for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Presently, however, understanding of its neurophysiological effects remains incomplete. In the present study, we utilised resting-state electroencephalography (RS-EEG) to explore changes in functional connectivity, network topology, and spectral power elicited by an acute open-label course of ECT in a cohort of 23 patients with treatment-resistant MDD. RS-EEG was recorded prior to commencement of ECT and again within 48 h following each patient’s final treatment session. Our results show that ECT was able to enhance connectivity within lower (delta and theta) frequency bands across subnetworks largely confined to fronto-central channels, while, conversely, more widespread subnetworks of reduced connectivity emerged within faster (alpha and beta) bands following treatment. Graph-based topological analyses revealed changes in measures of functional segregation (clustering coefficient), integration (characteristic path length), and small-world architecture following ECT. Finally, post-treatment enhancement of delta and theta spectral power was observed, which showed a positive association with the number of ECT sessions received. Overall, our findings indicate that RS-EEG can provide a sensitive measure of dynamic neural activity following ECT and highlight network-based analyses as a promising avenue for furthering mechanistic understanding of the effects of convulsive therapies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-74103-y
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144321

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.