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Demographic, behavioural and anthropometric correlates of food liking: A cross‐sectional analysis of young adults

Livingstone, K. M., Pnosamy, H., Riddell, L. J. and Cicerale, S. 2020, Demographic, behavioural and anthropometric correlates of food liking: A cross‐sectional analysis of young adults, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/nu12103078.

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Title Demographic, behavioural and anthropometric correlates of food liking: A cross‐sectional analysis of young adults
Author(s) Livingstone, K. M.ORCID iD for Livingstone, K. M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Pnosamy, H.
Riddell, L. J.ORCID iD for Riddell, L. J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
Cicerale, S.ORCID iD for Cicerale, S. orcid.org/0000-0002-1100-0423
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 10
Article ID 3078
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-10-09
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) food liking
diet quality
dietary guideline index
body mass index
health behaviours
correlates
young adults
Australian
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
LIFE-STYLE
HEALTH
ASSOCIATION
PREFERENCES
NUTRIENTS
NUTRITION
PATTERNS
CHOICES
HABITS
Summary The degree to which foods are liked or disliked is associated with dietary intake and health behaviours. However, most food liking research has focused on single foods and nutrients and few studies have examined associations with demographics and health behaviours. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the association between food liking and socio‐demographics, health behaviours, diet quality and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of young Australian adults. Data from 1728 undergraduate students (21.8 (standard deviation [SD] 6.0) years; 76% female) were used. Food liking scores and a diet quality index (Dietary Guideline Index, DGI) were estimated from a Food Liking Questionnaire and Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), respectively. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to assess the association between food liking and correlates. Young adults with higher liking for encouraged core foods were older, female, did their own food shopping, consumed less packaged foods and had better diet quality. Higher liking for discretionary foods and beverages was associated with less healthy behaviours, such as smoking, higher BMI and lower diet quality. These results suggest that food liking measures may offer an appropriate methodology for understanding influences on young adults’ food choices, adding to the body of literature investigating the potential for food liking scores to assess diet–disease relationships.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12103078
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144466

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.