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Getting active with active video games: A quasi-experimental study

Liang, Y, Lau, PWC, Jiang, Y and Maddison, R 2020, Getting active with active video games: A quasi-experimental study, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 21, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17217984.

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Title Getting active with active video games: A quasi-experimental study
Author(s) Liang, Y
Lau, PWC
Jiang, Y
Maddison, RORCID iD for Maddison, R orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 21
Article ID 7984
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-10-30
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
children
sedentary time
physical activity
active video game
accelerometer
after-school time
CHILDRENS PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
HEALTH INDICATORS
PLAY
OVERWEIGHT
YOUTH
PARTICIPATION
INTERVENTION
EXERCISE
Summary Given the cultural emphasis on academic achievement and environmental constraints to physical activity (PA), active video games (AVGs) may be used to decrease sedentary behavior and increase PA of Hong Kong children. This study explored the potential of a school-based AVG intervention on sedentary time, PA, body composition, and psychosocial factors among children. Eighty-seven children (intervention n = 30) were recruited from one primary school. Classes in Grades 4–6 were allocated to either the intervention group or the control group in a 2:1 ratio. The eight-week intervention involved children playing AVGs in an after-school class twice a week. Participants in the control group continued with their usual activities. Outcome included the change of participants in sedentary time, PA, percentage body fat, body mass index (BMI), and psychosocial variables (enjoyment, self-efficacy and social support), from baseline to eight weeks. No significant group differences were observed in sedentary time (−33.9 min/day, 95% CI −70.8 to 4.8; p = 0.07). The intervention group significantly increased total PA (53.7 counts/min, 95% CI 8.6 to 104.2; p = 0.04) compared with those in the control condition. No differences were found in body composition and psychosocial variables. However, significant treatment effects were found on BMI z score among boys (−0.1, 95% CI −0.2 to 0; p = 0.04). An eight-week school-based AVG intervention delivered during after-school hours was effective in increasing activity levels among Hong Kong children. The treatment effects of AVGs on sedentary behavior and body composition need to be further demonstrated in a more robust study, especially in boys.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17217984
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145116

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.