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From “It Has Stopped Our Lives” to “Spending More Time Together Has Strengthened Bonds”: The Varied Experiences of Australian Families During COVID-19

Evans, Subhadra, Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Klas, Annamaria, Olive, Lisa, Sciberras, Emma, Karantzas, Gery and Westrupp, Elizabeth 2020, From “It Has Stopped Our Lives” to “Spending More Time Together Has Strengthened Bonds”: The Varied Experiences of Australian Families During COVID-19, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.588667.

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Title From “It Has Stopped Our Lives” to “Spending More Time Together Has Strengthened Bonds”: The Varied Experiences of Australian Families During COVID-19
Author(s) Evans, SubhadraORCID iD for Evans, Subhadra orcid.org/0000-0002-1898-0030
Mikocka-Walus, AntoninaORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Klas, AnnamariaORCID iD for Klas, Annamaria orcid.org/0000-0002-6590-5164
Olive, LisaORCID iD for Olive, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0003-4643-8561
Sciberras, EmmaORCID iD for Sciberras, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-2812-303X
Karantzas, GeryORCID iD for Karantzas, Gery orcid.org/0000-0002-1503-2991
Westrupp, ElizabethORCID iD for Westrupp, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0001-6517-6064
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 11
Article ID 588667
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-10-20
ISSN 1664-1078
1664-1078
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
COVID-19
qualitative study
family relationships
Australia
social restrictions
MENTAL-HEALTH
SOCIAL-ISOLATION
STRESS
WORK
CONFLICT
DEPRESSION
RESILIENCE
Summary The present study uses a qualitative approach to understand the impact of COVID-19 on family life. Australian parents of children aged 0–18 years were recruited via social media between April 8 and April 28, 2020, when Australians were experiencing social distancing/isolation measures for the first time. As part of a larger survey, participants were asked to respond via an open-ended question about how COVID-19 had impacted their family. A total of 2,130 parents were included and represented a diverse range of family backgrounds. Inductive template thematic analysis was used to understand patterns of meaning across the texts. Six themes were derived from the data, including “Boredom, depression and suicide: A spectrum of emotion,” “Families are missing the things that keep them healthy,” “Changing family relationships: The push pull of intimacy,” “The unprecedented demands of parenthood,” “The unequal burden of COVID-19,” and “Holding on to positivity.” Overall, the findings demonstrated a breadth of responses. Messages around loss and challenge were predominant, with many families reporting mental health difficulties and strained family relationships. However, not all families were negatively impacted by the restrictions, with some families reporting positive benefits and meaning, including opportunities for strengthening relationships, finding new hobbies, and developing positive characteristics such as appreciation, gratitude, and tolerance.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.588667
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Evans, Mikocka-Walus, Klas, Olive, Sciberras, Karantzas and Westrupp
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145284

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.