Openly accessible

Nutrition and packaging characteristics of toddler foods and milks in Australia

McCann, Jennifer R., Russell, Catherine G., Campbell, Karen J. and Woods, Julie L. 2020, Nutrition and packaging characteristics of toddler foods and milks in Australia, Public Health Nutrition, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1017/s1368980020004590.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
woods-nutritionandpackaging-post-2020.pdf Accepted version application/pdf 1.15MB 209

Title Nutrition and packaging characteristics of toddler foods and milks in Australia
Author(s) McCann, Jennifer R.ORCID iD for McCann, Jennifer R. orcid.org/0000-0002-8940-978X
Russell, Catherine G.
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Woods, Julie L.ORCID iD for Woods, Julie L. orcid.org/0000-0002-2717-310X
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020-11-13
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Audit
child
claims
environment
food
marketing
nutrition
policy
snack
Snack food
Summary Objective: To analyse nutritional and packaging characteristics of toddler-specific foods and milks in the Australian retail food environment to identify how such products fit within the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) and the NOVA classification. Design: Cross-sectional retail audit of toddler foods and milks. On-pack product attributes were recorded. Products were categorised as (1) food or milk; (2) snack food or meal and (3) snacks sub-categorised depending on main ingredients. Products were classified as a discretionary or core food as per the ADG and level of processing according to NOVA classification. Setting: Supermarkets and pharmacies in Australia. Results: A total of 154 foods and thirty-two milks were identified. Eighty percentage of foods were snacks, and 60 % of foods were classified as core foods, while 85 % were ultraprocessed (UP). Per 100 g, discretionary foods provided significantly more energy, protein, total and saturated fat, carbohydrate, total sugar and Na (P < 0·001) than core foods. Total sugars were significantly higher (P < 0·001) and Na significantly lower (P < 0·001) in minimally processed foods than in UP foods. All toddler milks (n 32) were found to have higher energy, carbohydrate and total sugar levels than full-fat cow’s milk per 100 ml. Claims and messages were present on 99 % of foods and all milks. Conclusions: The majority of toddler foods available in Australia are UP snack foods and do not align with the ADG. Toddler milks, despite being UP, do align with the ADG. A strengthened regulatory approach may address this issue.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/s1368980020004590
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145555

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 258 Abstract Views, 211 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 20 Nov 2020, 08:39:10 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.