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Energy depletion and opportunistic microbial colonisation in white syndrome lesions from corals across the Indo-Pacific

Smith, Hillary A., Conlan, Jessica A., Pollock, F. Joseph, Wada, Naohisa, Shore, Amanda, Hung, JuliaYun‑Hsuan, Aeby, Greta S., Willis, Bette L., Francis, David S. and Bourne, David G. 2020, Energy depletion and opportunistic microbial colonisation in white syndrome lesions from corals across the Indo-Pacific, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-76792-x.

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Title Energy depletion and opportunistic microbial colonisation in white syndrome lesions from corals across the Indo-Pacific
Author(s) Smith, Hillary A.
Conlan, Jessica A.ORCID iD for Conlan, Jessica A. orcid.org/0000-0003-0908-0345
Pollock, F. Joseph
Wada, Naohisa
Shore, Amanda
Hung, JuliaYun‑Hsuan
Aeby, Greta S.
Willis, Bette L.
Francis, David S.ORCID iD for Francis, David S. orcid.org/0000-0002-4829-6926
Bourne, David G.
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Article ID 19990
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Nature
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-12
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Summary Corals are dependent upon lipids as energy reserves to mount a metabolic response to biotic and abiotic challenges. This study profiled lipids, fatty acids, and microbial communities of healthy and white syndrome (WS) diseased colonies of Acropora hyacinthus sampled from reefs in Western Australia, the Great Barrier Reef, and Palmyra Atoll. Total lipid levels varied significantly among locations, though a consistent stepwise decrease from healthy tissues from healthy colonies (HH) to healthy tissue on WS-diseased colonies (HD; i.e. preceding the lesion boundary) to diseased tissue on diseased colonies (DD; i.e. lesion front) was observed, demonstrating a reduction in energy reserves. Lipids in HH tissues were comprised of high energy lipid classes, while HD and DD tissues contained greater proportions of structural lipids. Bacterial profiling through 16S rRNA gene sequencing and histology showed no bacterial taxa linked to WS causation. However, the relative abundance of Rhodobacteraceae-affiliated sequences increased in DD tissues, suggesting opportunistic proliferation of these taxa. While the cause of WS remains inconclusive, this study demonstrates that the lipid profiles of HD tissues was more similar to DD tissues than to HH tissues, reflecting a colony-wide systemic effect and provides insight into the metabolic immune response of WS-infected Indo-Pacific corals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-76792-x
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145582

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.