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The dual function model of attachment security priming: theoretical framework and empirical evidence

Ai, Ting, Gillath, Omri and Karantzas, Gery C. 2020, The dual function model of attachment security priming: theoretical framework and empirical evidence, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 21, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17218093.

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Title The dual function model of attachment security priming: theoretical framework and empirical evidence
Author(s) Ai, Ting
Gillath, Omri
Karantzas, Gery C.ORCID iD for Karantzas, Gery C. orcid.org/0000-0002-1503-2991
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 21
Article ID 8093
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) attachment security
dual function model
priming
salivary cortisol
Summary According to attachment theory, security providing attachment figures fulfill two main functions: (1) safe haven—providing safety and comfort and reducing stress—helping people regain a sense of security; and (2) secure base—providing resources and a base from which people can spring into action. According to the Dual Function of Security Priming Model, security priming can result in one of two outcomes paralleling these two functions. Which outcome is likely to present itself depends on the level of stress imposed by the context. Here we describe the Dual Function Model of Security Priming (DFSP) Model and provide evidence from a study examining the effects of attachment security priming on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity. In the study, participants were exposed to security-related cues under high or low/no-stress conditions, while their salivary cortisol concentrations were measured. Cortisol is a suitable index as it is released not only in response to stress, but also more generally when energy needs to be mobilized. We found that while security priming led to significant decreases in salivary cortisol concentrations when presented after a stressor (stress reduction), it led to a significant increase in salivary cortisol concentrations when presented before the stressor (energy mobilization)
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17218093
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145587

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.