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A Dynamic Artificial Potential Field (D-APF) UAV Path Planning Technique for following Ground Moving Targets

Jayaweera, Herath Mpc and Hanoun, Samer 2020, A Dynamic Artificial Potential Field (D-APF) UAV Path Planning Technique for following Ground Moving Targets, IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 192760-192776, doi: 10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3032929.

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Title A Dynamic Artificial Potential Field (D-APF) UAV Path Planning Technique for following Ground Moving Targets
Author(s) Jayaweera, Herath Mpc
Hanoun, SamerORCID iD for Hanoun, Samer orcid.org/0000-0002-8697-1515
Journal name IEEE Access
Volume number 8
Start page 192760
End page 192776
Total pages 17
Publisher IEEE
Place of publication Piscataway, N.J.
Publication date 2020-10-21
ISSN 2169-3536
Keyword(s) unmanned aerial vehicles
path planning
artificial potential field
ground moving targets
Science & Technology
Technology
Computer Science, Information Systems
Engineering, Electrical & Electronic
Telecommunications
Computer Science
Engineering
Vehicle dynamics
Target tracking
Force
Sensors
Navigation
TRACKING
SYSTEM
Summary Path planning is a vital and challenging component in the support of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and their deployment in autonomous missions, such as following ground moving target. Few attempts are reported in the literature on multirotor UAV path planning techniques for following ground moving targets despite the great improvement in their control dynamics, flying behaviors and hardware specifications. These attempts suffer several drawbacks including their hardware dependency, high computational requirements, inability to handle obstacles and dynamic environments in addition to their low performance regarding the moving target speed variations. In this paper, a novel dynamic Artificial Potential Field (D-APF) path planning technique is developed for multirotor UAVs for following ground moving targets. The UAV produced path is a smooth and flyable path suitable to dynamic environments with obstacles and can handle different motion profiles for the ground moving target including change in speed and direction. Additionally, the proposed path planning technique effectively supports UAVs following ground moving targets while maneuvering ahead and at a standoff distance from the target. It is hardware-independent where it can be used on most types of multirotor UAVs with an autopilot flight controller and basic sensors for distance measurements. The developed path planning technique is tested and validated against existing general potential field techniques for different simulation scenarios in ROS and gazebo-supported PX4-SITL. Simulation results show that the proposed D-APF is better suited for UAV path planning for following moving ground targets compared to existing general APFs. In addition, it outperforms the general APFs as it is more suitable for UAVs flying in environments with dynamic and unknown obstacles.
Language eng
DOI 10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3032929
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 08 Information and Computing Sciences
09 Engineering
10 Technology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145910

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.